18th century

1700 to 1799.

Showing 1–100 of 134 results

  • Pair 18th Century Pierced Creamware Baskets With Stands England Circa 1780

    $3,600.00

    This elegant pair of pierced creamware baskets have beautifully curved strands of openwork creamware. The creamware is molded to imitate the texture of 18th-century English reeded grass or wood baskets. The baskets have twisted rope handles with leaf and flower terminals (see close-up #7). The overall effect is lovely!

    Dimensions of baskets: 10″ x 7.25″ x 2.75″ tall

    Dimensions of stands: 11″ x 9.25″

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Wedgwood Creamware Coffee Pot England Circa 1780

    $1,160.00

    This 18th-century Wedgwood creamware coffee pot has shell edge decoration on the body, handle, and cover, which is surmounted by a stunning finial in the form of a beautiful blossoming rose. The shell edge was one of the first decorative designs that Josiah Wedgwood used in his pottery creations.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ tall x 6″ from end of spout to handle x 4.75″ diameter at the widest point.

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair 18th Century Creamware Platters with Shell Edge England Circa 1785

    $580.00

    This pair of 18th-century creamware oval-shaped platters have lovely shell edge and leaf-form decoration. The two designs are beautifully combined so that they seem to flow into and complement each other. The overall effect is very pretty.

    Dimensions: 11″ x 8″ x .75″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Wedgwood Creamware Coffee Pot England Circa 1780

    $760.00

    This 18th Century Wedgwood creamware coffee pot has a delicate rose finial and lovely impressed fluting around the body, below the spout, and on the cover. Undecorated creamware is all about form. The dimensions of this two-cup coffee pot are visually appealing. The fluting adds visual interest to the gently curving silhouette. Made in England circa 1780, the simplicity and elegance of the form are neoclassical.

    Dimensions: 6.75″ tall x 5.25″ deep x 4″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent with light staining, especially on the handle due to impurities in the clay when made.

    The underside is marked “WEDGWOOD” and has the label of the prominent English antique ceramics dealer John Howard.

  • 18th Century Creamware Pitcher James & Charles Whitehead Yorkshire England C-1780

    $1,260.00

    This elegant water pitcher has neoclassical decoration consisting of two bands of impressed fluting and a lovely intertwined rope handle with leaf and flower terminals. The pitcher is baluster shaped on a domed foot, the body and foot partially fluted, the wavy rim with simple ribbed molding outside and molded with scrollwork and foliage inside opposite the high spreading lip; the ribbed double intertwined loop handle with flower and leaf terminals. The pitcher was made in Staffordshire, England, circa 1780, by James and Charles Whitehead, Hanley.

    For an image and description, see Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, p.127, by Peter Walton, where Walton states, “Corresponds exactly to no.115 in WPB (The Whitehead Catalog 1798) Fluted without cover(s). Note especially the piece of moulded scrollwork inside the rim and the terminal type, both of which agree precisely with the WPB design.”

    The underside has a sticker for Maria and Peter Warren Antiques.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ tall x 6.75″ deep x 4.25″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of 18th Century English Creamware Dishes With Silver Form Edge

    $480.00

    This pair of 18th-century English creamware dishes were made in the style of silver dishes of the period. This elegant neoclassical style is known as the “silver edge.” The borders are gently lobed, have lovely raised edges, and are divided into six panels.

    Dimensions: 7.5″ diameter x 1″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Creamware Pepper Shaker England Circa 1780

    $280.00

    This 18th Century creamware pepper shaker was made in either Yorkshire or Staffordshire, England circa 1780.

    It has a simple, elegant form and a lovely creamy color.

    Dimensions: 5″ tall x 2″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Very good with light craquelure to the pierced top.

  • 18th Century Wedgwood Creamware Cup and Saucer England Circa 1780

    $285.00

    This is an exquisite 18th-century Wedgwood creamware cup and saucer. Made in England circa 1780, the cup has a beautiful rope twist handle with leaf form terminals and elegant impressed vertical fluting that adds visual interest. The underside of the cup and saucer are marked with “WEDGWOOD” impressed.

    Dimensions: 3″ tall x 5″ diameter for the saucer x 2.6″ diameter for the cup

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Leeds Creamware Tureen Made Circa 1780

    $2,600.00

    Leeds Pottery made this exquisite creamware soup tureen in Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. The simple rolled edge on the cover and the foot of the tureen is known as the silver edge. The shape of the tureen is taken from silver tureens of the period. It is perfectly proportioned and beautifully decorated with elegant intertwined rope handles. On the cover, we find a crisply molded rope twist finial, applied decoration in the form of acanthus leaves, wheat sheaves, and a single flower. The overall effect is beautiful!

    Dimensions:  12″ x 8″ x 8″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Late 18th Century Creamware Egg Drainer Made Yorkshire Circles Circa 1790

    $320.00

    Made in Yorkshire circa 1790, this creamware egg drainer has lovely symmetrical piercings, including four heart shapes. For a small useful item, it is exceptionally beautiful. Pierced with an openwork pattern, the drainer has a short handle molded with scrollwork and a small round piercing for hanging on a wall. For a similar example, see Creamware and Other English Pottery At Temple Newsam House, Leeds, p.114.

    Dimensions: 3.25″ diameter x 3.75″ from the end of the handle to the front of the drainer

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Creamware Dish Made England Circa 1785

    $330.00

    This is a beautiful creamware dish with a feather edge design, pierced diamonds and dots, and tiny pearls along the inner edge of the border. The cavetto is fluted. The overall effect is lovely. The dish is described in Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, by Peter Walton, on page 144, Ill 573, where he describes this dish as “Circular, with moulded borders, the walls of the central recess fluted, the rim pierced with a band of openwork pattern.” Made in “Staffordshire or Yorkshire 1780s-1790s”.

    Dimensions: 8″ diameter x .5″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Wedgwood Creamware Charger Made England circa 1820

    $380.00

    This beautiful Wedgwood creamware charger was made circa 1820. It has lovely impressed basketweave decoration that radiates from a central medallion. The border has eye-catching arcades.

    Dimensions:11″ diameter x 1.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Wedgwood Creamware Baskets Early 19th Century England Circa 1820

    $1,530.00

    Made in Stoke on Trent, England, circa 1820, this pair of Wedgwood creamware baskets and stands has beautiful proportions decorated with neoclassical designs. The baskets and stands have matching arcades. The baskets rise from a spreading base. Above that are bands of impressed decoration. We see loops that imitate the texture of 18th-century English reeded grass or wood baskets. The baskets are further decorated with a lovely band of “pearls.” The stands are decorated with impressed basketweave decoration that radiates from a center medallion out to the arcade.

    The underside of each basket with impressed “WEDGWOOD” mark and a paper label for the antique pottery dealer Earl Vandekar.

    Dimensions: basket 10″ long x 6″ wide x 5″ to top of handle   stand 10.25″ long x 8.5″ wide

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Small Pierced Creamware Dish England Circa 1785

    $285.00

    This 18th-century creamware plate was made in Staffordshire, England, circa 1785. It is a little gem with beautiful piercings on the border and angled fluting in the cavetto. The hand piercings are in the shape of diamonds, stars, and hearts. The fluting in the cavetto adds visual interest as light plays across the fluting.

    Dimensions: 6″ in diameter x .5″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with minimal defects due to impurities in the clay when the plate was fired.

  • 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dish England Circa 1780

    $560.00

    The border of this 18th-century creamware dish has exquisite piercings in the form of diamonds, dots, and hearts. The piercings were done by hand. Along the rim beyond the piercings is a band of impressed tiny “pearls.” The overall effect is lovely!

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter x .75″ height

    Condition: Excellent with a small spot on the edge where the glaze didn’t take when the piece was fired (see images).

  • Wedgwood 18th Century Pierced Creamware with Painted Decoration England C-1785

    $580.00

    This Wedgwood pierced creamware dish was made at the Wedgwood factory in Stoke-on-Trent, England, circa 1785. The elegant piercings are hand-made. The cavetto is decorated with a band of eye-catching red up-down squiggles. The edge of the plate is decorated with a thin band of brown slip. The overall effect is exquisite! This plate is one of my favorites.

    On the underside is the impressed mark “WEDGWOOD.”

    Dimensions: 9″ in diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century English Creamware Charger

    $860.00

    This beautiful 18th-century English creamware charger copies the elegant style of English chargers made of silver. The style consists of a lobed edge  and a rolled, grooved border that divides the border into six panels. The style is known as the “Silver  Edge.”

    The Neoclassical style was all the rage in England in the second half of the 18th century prized the silver form’s simple lines.
    This charger is part of our extensive collection of antique creamware.

  • Two 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dishes Oval Shaped Made England Circa 1785

    $770.00

    Both of these creamware dishes have beautiful piercings in the form of hearts, dots, and diamonds. Made in eighteenth-century England circa 1785, they have lovely impressed neoclassical decoration on the border. The main image shows that the lower dish has a “Silver Edge” and the upper dish has a “Feather Edge.” The upper dish also has a pair of female portraits, and both dishes have vine-form decoration.

    Dimensions: the upper dish measures 10.5″ x 9″ x .75″ in height, and the lower dish measures  11″ x 9.75″ x .75″ in height

    Condition: Excellent with some original light mineral staining on the edge of both dishes

  • 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dish Oval Shaped England Circa 1780

    $320.00

    Made in Staffordshire or Yorkshire, England, circa 1785, this beautiful 18th-century creamware dish is decorated with neoclassical decoration. The border has handmade piercings in the form of dots, diamonds, and stars. The border is also decorated with impressed delicate foliate swags that drop into the cavetto and is further decorated with a lovely “Feather Edge.”

    Dimensions: 9″ x 7.5″ x 1.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Dish Hand-Painted 18th Century, England, Circa 1760

    $560.00

    This Delft blue and white dish was hand-painted in England in the 18th century circa 1760.
    The painting is quite naive but eye-catching.
    In the center, we see a large blue ground before three homes, each with a chimney.
    To the left, we see a large peony, and to the right, a pine tree.
    The wide border shows six flower buds on the vine, and along the edge are scrolling vines.
    Dimensions: 9.25″ diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $560
    Background of English Delft:
    The art of making Delft began in England in the Mid-1500s. An English delftware jug has been found in East Malling, Kent, with a silver mount hallmarked 1550, which is presumed to be the earliest date of English delftware manufacture. John Stow’s Survey of London (1598) records the arrival in 1567 of two Antwerp potters, Jasper Andries and Jacob Jansen, in Norwich, where they made “Gally Paving Tiles and vessels for Apothecaries and others…”
    The production of Delft reached its high point in the mid-1700s around the time this pair of chargers were made; after that, creamware pottery began to replace Delft as the useful pottery of the English middle class.
    See: Caiger-Smith, Alan, Tin-glazed Pottery in Europe and the Islamic World: The Tradition of 1000 Years in Maiolica, Faience and Delftware, Faber and Faber, 1973, ISBN 0-571-09349-3.

  • A Leeds Pottery Creamware Centerpiece Made England Circa 1785

    $3,600.00

    This fabulous 18th-century English creamware sculpture was made by the Leeds Pottery, Yorkshire, circa 1785. It consists of the two top pieces of the Leeds Platt Menage. The Platt Menage is perhaps the ultimate creamware creation. Four female figures in the form of winged mermaids hold up a covered bowl on their shoulders. The bowl is decorated with neoclassical decorations: portraits and scrolling vines. The cover is decorated with acanthus leaves and an egg and dart border along the edge. A beautiful figure of Venus surmounts the cover. The overall effect is magnificent!

    The Platt Menage is now mounted on a block of cherry wood secured by museum putty (so it is removable).

    Dimensions: 11.5″ tall x 5.5″ diameter at the widest point x 2.75″ across the base

    Condition: Very good, with some excellent invisible restoration to several small chips on the mermaids’ wings.

    According to Peter Walton, the attribution of this Platt Menage to Leeds Pottery is traditional (see pg. 121 in Creamware and other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds. Mr. Walton continues to describe the Platt Menagein plate 462. It is described as havingPale cream with a yellow glaze.” Walton quotes Jewitt 1878, I, p.477, fig 854, “They (Platt Menages) were greatly admired by the early collectors. It is well to show collectors to what degree of perfection in design these almost forgotten works had achieved.”

  • Pair 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dishes England Circa 1780

    $820.00

    This pair of lovely creamware dishes have wide borders with exquisite handworked piercings. Many of the piercings are in the form of a heart. The cavetto is beautifully fluted. The fluting adds life to the dish as light plays over the curves of each flute.

    Dimensions: 9.25″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent.

  • 18th Century Leeds Pottery Creamware Tureen Yorkshire, England Circa 1780

    $3,600.00

    Leeds Pottery made this perfectly proportioned large 18th-century creamware tureen in Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. It is embellished with elegant rope handles that end in sprigged* wheat sheaf terminals. The beautiful cover is decorated with an elegant rope knop and delicate sprigged flowers and leaves. Three bands of crisply molded Feather Edge design encircle the body’s base and midline and the cover’s outer edge. The quality of the material and workmanship is equal to the work of the best porcelain factories of the period.

    For an image and description, see Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds p.94, by Peter Walton where Walton states that the tureen has “Pale cream with a greenish-yellow glaze. Oval, four-lobed with bowed sides, spreading foot, moulded feather borders and a pair of double-terminals, the domed lid with a cord loop handle with straggling terminals of flowers, stems and leaves.”

    Dimensions: 14″ across the handles x 10.25″ wide x 10.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent with one small chip on the inside flange professionally restored

  • Pierced Creamware Bowl with Cover 18th Century England Circa 1780

    $1,260.00

    Made in Staffordshire or Yorkshire, England, circa 1780, this pierced, covered creamware bowl was made for serving fruits, nuts, or sweets. The cover has intricate, expertly crafted handmade piercings in the form of hearts, dots, and diamonds (see images). The delicate, all-around, pierced decoration is outstanding. A fabulous rose finial tops the cover. The bowl has impressed ribbing around the base and impressed fluting around the lower half.
    For an image and description, see Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, by Peter Walton pgs.107-108, where Walton states, “Pale cream with a pale green glaze…on a high spreading foot the lower part of the body fluted, the upper part plain with a turned ribbed border at the rim, the domed lid with panels of pierced openwork…and with large flower-knob with leaf and bud terminal.”

    Dimensions: 6″ diameter x 6.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent. The cover’s inside has mineral staining due to impurities in the clay when fired. There is no staining on the outside.

  • Pierced Creamware Covered Bowl 18th Century England Circa 1780

    $1,160.00

    This lovely pierced, covered creamware bowl was made in Staffordshire or Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. It was made to serve fruits, nuts, or sweets. The bowl and its cover have intricate, expertly crafted handmade piercings. The delicate, all-around, pierced decoration is outstanding. Extensive open piercings like this are rare on 18th-century English creamware. An elegant acorn finial adds height to the bowl.

    The underside of the bowl has a label for prominent English antique pottery dealer John Howard.

    Dimensions: 5.75″ diameter x 7″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Large Dutch Delft Vases Hand-Painted Circa 1800 Made by “The Claw”

    $7,800.00

    Why we love it; The painting is delicious!
    This pair of antique Dutch Delft polychrome vases are hand-painted circa 1800 in the exquisite Cashmere palette of intense greens, blues, and oranges. Made in the factory of “The Claw” circa 1800, the vases show an all-around scene with long-tailed birds in a flower-filled garden. The Cashmere palette with these colors first appeared in Delft potteries between 1700 and 1720. The color combination was inspired by the arrival in Europe in the late 17th century of Chinese Famille Verte porcelain.
    Both vases have the “The Claw” mark in underglaze blue on the underside.

    Dimensions: 20.5″ tall x 8″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent
    Background of Delft:
    The technique of making Delft was first described by Gerrit Paape in “Delft Pottery Maker,” written in 1794. Dedicated to Lambertus Sanderus, the owner of De Porceleyne Claeuw (The Porcelain Claw). Delft faience began in the 17th century. Much of the finest Delft was produced in the Dutch city of Delft. The Delft potters began to coat their pots thoroughly in a white tin glaze. They then began to cover the white tin glaze with a clear glaze, giving the fired surface depth. Over time they created a good resemblance to porcelain. By about 1650, the technical skills of the potters and painters were much improved, and Delft began its golden age.

  • Large Blue and White Dutch Delft Jar Made Early 18th Century, Circa 1710-1720

    $1,160.00

    This blue and white Delft jar was made in the Netherlands in the early 18th century, circa 1710-1720. The jar is covered in a gorgeous light green-blue glaze traditional to some early Dutch Delft. The style of painting is derived from Kangxi era Chinese wares with decorative patterns carefully delineated. The Chinoiserie decoration shows floral and geometric images and a Dutch interpretation of the “cracked ice” effect found on contemporary blue and white Chinese porcelains. The effect is dramatic and beautiful.

    Dimensions: 19.5″ tall x 9.75″ at widest point

    Condition: Good, with restoration to the jar’s collar and the cover’s edge.

  • Delft Punch Bowl Hand-Painted, Netherlands, 18th Century, Circa 1780

    $3,400.00

    This 18th-century Dutch Delft punch bowl is hand-painted in beautiful polychrome colors of orange, green, and cobalt blue. Dozens of individual green-leaved orange tulips seem to rise from the base of the bowl. The effect is beautiful. Panels of orange “diamonds” and smaller solid green panels create a wide border around the top of the bowl. The inside rim of the bowl is decorated with scrolling vines painted in orange and blue. In the well of the bowl, we see one beautiful large tulip.

    Dimensions: 13″ diameter x 6″ tall

    Condition: Excellent with small frits along the bottom edge and small frits invisibly restored along the top edge (see images).

    The bowl is marked on the underside with “D M” in blue monochrome. This mark is noted in Marks and Monograms on Pottery and Porcelain by William Chaffers on pg 276 as the mark of an unknown Dutch Delft factory.

  • Dutch Delft Pancake Plate Lightning Pattern by De Paeuw ‘The Peacock’ Circa 1730

    $930.00

    This extraordinary Dutch Delft pancake plate was made in the early 18th century. Beautifully hand-painted, it features bold zigzag lighting bolts, Bliksemborden, which seem to flash across the plate. Between the lightning bolts, we see clouds painted yellow with red decorations and flowering plants painted blue, green, yellow, and orange. This is one of the very best Dutch polychrome designs. Made by the De Paeuw (The Peacock) factory circa 1730, the decoration on this plate was inspired by Japanese Imari porcelains.

    For an image and more information on this plate, see Delft Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art by B Schaap pg. 52.

    Dimensions: 9″ in diameter x 1″ tall

    Condition: Excellent with tiny edge frits invisibly restored

  • Pair of Hand-Painted Dutch Delft Imari Plates 18th Century Circa 1780

    $1,230.00

    The lovely scene on this pair of Dutch pancake plates is hand-painted in bold Imari colors of cobalt blue and iron red, highlighted by forest green and bright yellow, which takes the place of gilding. A pair of long-tailed songbirds fly amid the flowers of an imaginary garden that rises above the garden fence. As is traditional with Dutch pancake plates, the scene covers the entire surface. There is no decorative border. The effect is marvelous!
    This pair of plates was made in the Netherlands circa 1780.

    Dimensions: 8.85″ in diameter x 1″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with very small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Pair Large Blue and White Chinese Porcelain Chargers Kangxi Era, circa 1700

    $12,500.00

    This pair of extraordinary chargers is hand-painted in a combination of beautifully soft and dark cobalt blue. In the center, we see a pair of splendid phoenixes, a male and a female, chasing each other across the sky. The male flies above with his head turned to look at the female. Peonies float between them. This dynamic mythical scene is exciting and exquisite.
    In Chinese tradition, both peonies and phoenixes have important symbolic meanings. Peonies symbolize royalty, rank, wealth, and honor and are much loved for their bold size and colors. A phoenix is said to appear only during the reign of a righteous emperor. That association with peaceful and benevolent times means that a phoenix symbolizes a wish for prosperity and righteousness.*
    A band of dark blue bat-form design encircling the central scene reinforces the symbolic wish for good fortune and happiness.
    The underside of each dish has the Artemesia leaf mark and is of the Kangxi period (see images).

    Dimensions: 13.8″ in diameter x 2.5″ in height

    Condition: Excellent with the very, very slightest rubbing to the edges

  • Creamware Heart Shaped Dish England Late 18th Century Made by Wedgwood and Co

    $240.00

    The first popular use of the heart shape as a symbol of love is often attributed to the importance of courtly romance in late-medieval life. At a time when chivalrous knights and damsels in distress made for romantic tales, tokens of love were deeply significant and very popular.
    This creamware heart-shaped dish was made in late 18th century England, circa 1790 by Wedgwood & Co.*
    The decoration is elegant: a floral swag of green, blue, and orange echoes the heart shape of the dish. The border is decorated with cobalt blue dots, accentuating the dish’s outline. At the center is a single small flower.
    With its warm creamware body and elegant decoration, this would also be a perfect “Hello” dish when placed near the front door of the home. It would also prove useful for holding keys and other small things.
    The underside of the dish is marked WEDGWOOD & Co.

    Dimensions: 10.5″ across x 7.5″ from point to top x 1.5″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with very small original firing defects in the creamware material, which can be seen when the images are enlarged.

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Antique Made Netherlands Circa 1770

    $960.00

    This blue and white Dutch Delft charger was hand-painted circa 1770. The center of the charger is decorated with a large flower. Beyond the center, we see two circles of tulip buds, leaves and scrolling vines. The vibrant cobalt blue decoration draws your eye from the center outward.

    Dimensions: diameter 13.35″

    Condition: Excellent with very small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Blue and White Dutch Delft Charger Netherlands Circa 1780 Chinoiserie Design

    $900.00

    Made in the factory of “The Axe” circa 1780, this blue and white Delft charger shows a lovely chinoiserie garden scene hand-painted in cobalt blue.
    In the center, we see a pine tree, a garden fence, and a large peony.
    The border is decorated with a delicate scrolling vine.
    The edge is painted with traditional ochre colored slip.
    The charger’s underside has the “The Axe” mark in underglaze blue.

    Dimensions: 13.75″ in diameter x 2″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with slight edge frits invisibly restored

  • Six Blue and White Chinese Porcelain Dishes Kangxi Era Made c-1700

    $5,800.00

    This set of six Chinese blue and white porcelain dishes was painted in the Kangxi era circa 1700. Each dish is hand-painted in a beautiful combination of soft and dark cobalt blue, and because they are hand-painted, each dish has small details that vary from the others. The decoration is exquisite! At the center of each dish, we see flowering peonies emanating from rockwork and branches with delicate plum blossoms. The borders have eight panels alternately showing a basket of flowers or a single plum blossom. The total effect is delightful, as if one is standing in a flower-filled garden. In Chinese tradition, the beautiful images on these dishes have symbolic meanings. Much loved for their bold size and colors; peonies are known as the flower of “riches and honor (fuguihua),” while plum blossoms (meihua) symbolize perseverance, purity, and hope*.
    The underside of each dish is painted with a traditional pair of scrolling vines in underglaze blue.

    Dimensions: 8.8″ in diameter x 1″ in height

    Condition: Excellent with very, very minor frits on the foot of each dish

  • Large Blue and White Arras Porcelain Round Soup Tureen French 18th Century

    $2,200.00

    This late 18th-century French soup tureen is decorated with an elegant design of delicate cornflower sprigs. The color of the porcelain body is a warm creamy white. The cornflower sprigs, handles, and border edging are decorated with beautiful deep blue enamel. The combination of the creamy white ground and the blue decoration is splendid. The makers of Arras porcelain specialized in porcelain painted in this entrancing twilight blue called “Bleu d’Arras.” Natural forms like the tree branch handle and the blue cornflower decorations were the height of French fashion in the last quarter of the 18th century. This tureen was made at the Arras porcelain factory circa 1780. The underside of the tureen is marked with the letters “AR” and the flying bird symbol of the Arras factory.

    Dimensions:10.25″ diameter x 9″ height

    Condition: Excellent, with some small original firing cracks along the outer edge of the cover (see image #3).

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Made by The Claw in the Netherlands circa 1780

    $830.00

    This beautiful blue and white Dutch Delft charger was hand-painted in deep cobalt blue in the factory of “The Claw” in the late 18th century, circa 1780. The decoration in the center shows a vase filled with sunflowers and ferns. The design is reminiscent of a peacock displaying its feathers. Since the 18th century, the pattern has been known as the “Peacock” pattern. The crisp yellow of the slip-painted rim brings out the color of the cobalt blue.

    Dimensions: diameter 12.5 inches

    Condition: Excellent with small edge chips invisibly refinished

  • Pair Large Blue and White Chinese Porcelain Jars Hand Painted Kangxi Era C-1700

    $17,800.00

    This exceptionally fine pair of Chinese porcelain jars were made circa 1700 in the reign of Emperor Kangxi. They are hand-painted in exquisite cobalt blue. Leafy peony scrolls seem to float over the surface of the baluster-shaped jars. The covers are similarly decorated, have a flared rim, and are surmounted by a rounded finial. The neck of each jar is decorated with traditional plantain leaves. The jars are characteristic of the outstanding blue-and-white ceramics manufactured during the reign of the Kangxi Emperor.

    According to Sir Harry Garner, author of Oriental Blue and White, “The Kangxi blue and white reached a technical excellence that has never been surpassed. The porcelain pure white and of fine texture is covered with a glaze of slightly blueish tint…”

    The jars are magnificent on display. They catch your eye from across the room and won’t let go. The design continues an ancient Chinese tradition of decorating porcelain with peonies and scrolling leaves. Peonies symbolize female beauty, royalty, wealth, and honor in Chinese tradition and have long been adored for their bold size and beautiful colors.

    Dimensions:15.5″ tall x 8.5″ at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent, with small edge chips along the top of the collars invisibly restored.

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Made Netherlands Circa 1770

    $1,160.00

    This blue and white Dutch Delft charger was hand-painted circa 1770. The center of the charger is decorated with a large flower. Beyond the center, we see two circles of tulip buds, leaves and scrolling vines. The vibrant cobalt blue decoration draws your eye from the center outward.

    Dimensions: diameter 13.35″

    Condition: Very Good (with small edge chips invisibly restored)

  • Chelsea Red Anchor Porcelain Dish Mid-18th Century England 1752-1756

    $1,140.00

    The wares of the Chelsea red anchor period (1752-1758), when this dish was made, are generally thought to be the finest work produced by the factory.*
    The charm of this Chelsea soft paste porcelain dish lies in the quality of the soft paste porcelain itself, the warm white glaze, and the soft colors of the fabulous hand-painted flowers and insects. The flowers and insects are painted in exquisite soft colors, which seem to sink into the soft paste porcelain.
    The painting is at the highest level of artistry. In the center, we see a loose bouquet of scattered flower sprigs, the largest sprig with a gorgeous purple rose, and a hairy caterpillar nearby. The border has crisp flowerhead and lattice molding reserving eight small panels painted with beautiful flowers and insects, one showing a butterfly and one a butterfly next to a ladybug. Along the rim, the dish has a brown line traditional to Chelsea.
    Begun in 1743, the Chelsea porcelain factory was England’s first important porcelain manufacturer. The factory made soft paste porcelain which is different than “true” hard paste porcelain and does not require the high firing temperatures or the unique mineral ingredients needed for “true” hard paste porcelain.                                                   Soft paste originated in the attempts by European potters to replicate hard paste Chinese porcelain.
    A dish decorated similar to ours and marked with the Chelsea red anchor is in the British Museum, accession number 1940,1101.70.

    Dimensions: 9.5″ wide (24cm)

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Delft Cows 18th Century Made De Porceleyne Lampetkan Netherlands Circa 1785

    $3,400.00

    This beautiful pair of cows was made around 1785 in the city of Delft.
    Since the late seventeenth century, Dutch Delft cows have adorned mantelpieces, furniture, and window sills. They were always produced in pairs, with their heads turned towards each other and their tongues lapping.
    This pair of cows are hand-painted with lavish floral garlands draped around their necks and backs. The garlands are painted in polychrome colors: yellow, orange, blue, green, and purple. Their hooves are painted purple, their horns yellow. Their tails wrap around their bodies. They stand on rectangular “grassy” bases. Both cows are marked on the underside with LPK in underglaze iron-red.

    Dimensions: 6.5″ long x 3″ wide x 6″ tall

    Condition: Some excellent invisible restoration

  • Large Blue and White Porcelain Soup Tureen French 18th Century

    $3,400.00

    Decorated with an elegant design of delicate blue cornflower sprigs, this soup tureen was made in Arras, France, in the late 18th century.
    The cornflower sprigs, handles, and border edging are decorated with beautiful deep blue enamel.
    The makers of Arras Porcelain specialized in porcelain painted in this entrancing twilight blue called “Bleu d’Arras.”
    The color of the porcelain body is a warm creamy white.
    The combination of the creamy white ground and the blue decoration is splendid.
    Natural forms like the tree branch handle and the blue cornflower decorations were the height of French fashion in the last quarter of the 18th century.
    Made at the Arras porcelain factory of the Delemers family circa 1780, both the tureen and its stand are marked in underglaze blue.
    The underside of the tureen is marked with the letters “AR” for the Delemers family Arras factory.
    The underside of the stand is marked “Dele AR” for the Delemers family Arras factory.

    Dimensions: 16″ wide x 13″ deep x 9.5″ tall

    Condition: Excellent, with some hard-to-see rubbing to the clear glaze on the stand

  • Pair Large Blue and White Delft Jars Made Netherlands 18th Century Circa 1780

    $7,400.00

    A pair of blue and white Dutch Delft covered vases octagonal and fluted with a deep cobalt blue all-over design of flowers and scrolling vines.
    The shoulder and base are decorated with acanthus leaves.
    Traditional lion finials top the covers.

    Dimensions: 16.75″ tall x 8.5″ across the widest point x 5″ across the base.

    Condition: Excellent with small edge chips invisibly restored

  • Pair Chinese Saucers 18th Century Hand Painted Turquoise Pink Green Gold Brown

    $480.00

    This pair of lovely hand-painted saucers were made in 18th-century China circa 1780. In the center of each saucer, we see flowers painted in gold and midnight brown. The fabulous Famille Rose colors of the border catch the eye. The combination of turquoise, pink, blue, and green in a design with both floral and geometric elements is perfect. The porcelain is so fine that we can see the decoration on the front of the saucers by looking through from the back (see image # 10).

    Dimensions: 4.75″ diameter x .5″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Group Blue and White Delft Chargers 18 Pieces Netherlands, Circa 1760-1780

    $29,340.00

    This group of blue and white Delft chargers has beautiful deep cobalt blue coloring. The white tin glaze is relatively uniform in its color. The sizes, colors, and designs make a harmonious group. The chargers were hand-painted between 1760 to 1780 and have wide borders with decoration around a central panel.

    They all measure between 13.25″ and 14″ in diameter.

    Condition: All are in excellent condition, with minimal edge frits invisibly restored.

  • Pair of Large Blue and White Delft Chargers Made 18th Century, Circa 1710

    $2,600.00

    This pair of blue and white Delft chargers were made in the mid-18th century circa 1710. The chargers were hand-painted in a medium tone of cobalt blue. We see an eye-catching, symmetrical floral pattern with flowers, budding flowers, and scrolling vines around a central budding tulip.

    Dimensions: 14″ in diameter x 1.75″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Pair Dutch Delft Dishes Hand Painted 18th Century Celebrating the Dutch Republic

    $840.00

    This pair of Delft dishes was hand-painted in the Netherlands in the 18th century circa 1780. We see a lion and the motto Nu Rust ik Veilig, “Now I Rest Safe.” The lion has a happy, friendly face. He is a symbol of the Netherlands. The words above him refer to the formation of the Dutch Republic. The seven arrows held together in the lion’s paw symbolize cooperation between the seven provinces of the Netherlands. Individually, the provinces were vulnerable, but together in the Dutch Republic, they became strong. The dish is painted in the polychrome colors of 18th-century Delft. The lion is painted in manganese. He rests on a moss-green grassy ground. The border is decorated with apples painted yellow and iron-red.

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter x 1″tall

    Condition: Excellent with small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Pair French Faience Dishes Made circa 1780

    $700.00

    We are pleased to offer these two 18th-century French faience light-hearted dishes painted with figures. The first plate, mustard yellow on a white ground, features an amusing stylized bird. The second plate light green on white ground shows the “Walking Man” a favorite theme of 18th-century European faience and Delft. Both plates have scalloped rims and similar floral motifs throughout. While not a true pair, the two dishes work well together as they are identical in size, the colors compliment each other and the style of painting is similar. They are an amusing and eye-catching pair. Our plates share many of the attributes of faience painted in Southwest France between 1730-1840: the natural scenes decorated in a chinoiserie style, the camaieu colors, and the flanking motifs around a central figure. Like our dishes, most of this type of faience was not signed, and the makers have remained anonymous.        References: “French Faience” by Jeanne Giacomotti, page 178.       Dimensions: diameter 9.75 inches               Condition: Excellent.                  Price: $700 for the pair.                             Each plate can be purchased individually for $400 each.

  • Two Chinese Imari Porcelain Chargers Hand-Painted Qianlong Era, Circa 1760

    $6,140.00

    These two beautiful Chinese Imari chargers were hand-painted in the Qianlong era in the mid-18th century. Both chargers show floral designs painted in cobalt blue, iron-red, and gold. The charger showing the basket of flowers in the center is also colored with peach enamels. Each charger is a work of art.

    #1 (the charger higher up in the first image):
    This large Chinese Imari porcelain charger dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. Finely potted with a lovely rich, glassy white glaze, the charger is hand-painted in a vivid Imari palette of orange-red, cobalt blue, and gold. We see chrysanthemums, lotus, and peony flowers in full bloom. The exquisite orange-red decoration is detailed and outlined in gold, which gives the design a luxurious look. On the underside, we see the artemisia leaf mark painted in underglaze blue within a traditional double ring. Typical of Chinese Imari ware in this period, the charger’s underside also bears a traditional sketch of two branches of plum blossoms.

    Dimensions: 14.15″ in diameter x 1.75″ in height.

    Condition: Very good with a single small edge chip invisibly restored to the highest standard.

    Price: $2,860

    #2 (the charger lower down in the first image):
    This large Chinese porcelain charger is hand-painted in the Imari style. It dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. The charger has a vivid palette of iron-red, peach, underglaze cobalt blue, and gold. In the center, we see a basket overflowing with flowers: chrysanthemums, peonies, and plum tree flowers, all in full bloom. The decoration is beautifully gilded, which gives the design a luxurious touch. The broad rim of the dish is adorned with scrolling vines, flowers, and far-away waterside views. In Chinese tradition, peonies symbolize royalty, wealth, and honor, plum tree flowers symbolize endurance, and chrysanthemums symbolize abundance and long life. Typical of the Chinese Imari ware at that time, the back of the charger bears a sketch of two branches of plum blossoms. At the center, the reverse shows the lingzhi mark in underglaze blue inside a double blue circle.

    Dimensions: 13.75″ diameter x 1.5″ height.

    Condition: Excellent with very slight rubbing to the gilt

    Price: $3,280

    The price for the pair of chargers is $6,140.

  • Pair Blue and White Delft Mantle Jars Hand Painted Netherlands, Circa 1770

    $2,700.00

    This pair of Dutch Delft mantle jars shows a delightful rococo scene hand-painted on blue and white Delft. We see a pair of cows resting in a fenced area with a flock of birds in the sky and in the background fields and mountains. The finial on the cover is in the form of the traditional spotted lion.

    Dimensions: 14.5″ tall x 6.5″ diameter at the widest point x 4″ diameter at the base.

    Condition: Excellent with small edge chips invisibly restored

  • Antique Blue and White Delft Group Jars and Vases

    $11,600.00

    The jars and vases in this group were made in the 18th and 19th centuries. All are in excellent or very good condition, with slight edge chips invisibly restored. They range in size from 10.5″ tall to 23.5″ tall. They are well matched for color, with the largest single jar made in the late 19th century showing a bit of the pink body under the glaze.

    Condition: Very Good to Excellent

    Price for the group: $11,600

  • Large Imari Chinese Porcelain Charger 18th Century circa 1760

    $3,200.00

    Why we love it: Look at the image!
    This beautiful Chinese porcelain charger is hand-painted in the Imari style. It dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. The charger has a vivid palette of iron-red, peach, underglaze cobalt blue, and gold. In the center, we see a basket overflowing with flowers: chrysanthemums, peonies, and plum tree flowers, all in full bloom. The decoration is beautifully gilded, which gives the design a luxurious touch. The broad rim of the dish is adorned with scrolling vines, flowers, and far-away waterside views. In Chinese tradition, peonies symbolize royalty, wealth, and honor, plum tree flowers symbolize endurance, and chrysanthemums symbolize abundance and long life. Typical of the Chinese Imari ware at that time, the back of the charger bears a sketch of two branches of plum blossoms. At the center the reverse shows the lingzhi mark in underglaze blue inside a double blue circle.

    Dimensions: 13.75″ diameter x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent with very slight rubbing to the gilt

  • Blue and White Delft Mantle Jar Netherlands circa 1780

    $1,640.00

    This charming blue and white Dutch Delft jar is decorated in shades of cobalt blue. Hand-painted in the late 18th century circa 1780, the jar mixes rococo and chinoiserie design elements. We see a modest house with blossoming fruit trees and pine trees. Beyond the house, we see water and a pagoda on the far shore. The cover is decorated with flowers. The finial on the cover has traditional blue stripes. On the reverse side of the jar is a single artemisia leaf, a Chinese symbol of wishes for good health. The shape of the jar is a traditional Dutch Delft round form rising from a round foot.

    Dimensions: 11.5″ tall x 6″ diameter at the widest point x 3.5″ diameter at the base

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of Blue and White Delft Shallow Bowls Netherlands circa 1770

    $830.00

    This charming pair of hand-painted blue and white Dutch Delft bowls is decorated in two tones of cobalt blue. The decoration is delicate, simple, and informal. At the center, we see a bird atop flowers, some in full bloom, others budding or partially open. The border is decorated with additional flowers, buds, and an all-around vine. The edge of the bowl is painted with a traditional Delft ochre-colored slip.

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter x 1.75″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Extra Large Chinese Punch Bowl Hand Painted Qianlong Period circa 1760

    $9,700.00

    An altogether fabulous bowl! The hand-painted Famille Rose decoration is exquisite and vibrant. We see lifelike carp beautifully painted in pink and orange swimming among stylized lotus inside the bowl. In Chinese tradition, fish swimming among lotus is a wish for continued success, and they inspire me. They are so well painted that we can almost feel them move around in the bowl. They look or swim upward, symbolizing the owner’s success in upward movement in society. Above the fish, the border on the rim shows clouds on turquoise ground and waterlilies with waves on iron-red ground. Painted on the outside of the bowl are superb pink and white peonies and beautiful clusters of plum tree flowers painted in cheerful pale yellow and pink. The colors are heightened by the green leaves that surround them. Truly magnificent.

    Dimensions: 15.75″ diameter x 6.75″ tall

    Condition: Current condition is excellent. Two 3″- 4″ hairlines were impeccably invisibly restored. The bottom of the well has original slight firing imperfections visible only if one enlarges image #3.

  • Blue and White Delft Dish Netherlands Circa 1800

    $430.00

    At the center of this lovely hand-painted blue and white Delft dish is a traditional chinoiserie view of a garden. We see an oversized peony, a willow tree, and rockwork. The wide border shows water lilies and flower buds. The artist used cobalt blue in various shades to enhance the beauty of the design. The dish was made circa 1800.

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter x 1″ height

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Blue and White Delft Plate with Bird Made Netherlands 18th Century Circa 1780

    $840.00

    This Delft dish is hand-painted in fabulous, bright cobalt blue. Its center shows a lovely garden with a songbird among flowers in full bloom and a willow tree with its branches hanging over the garden. The border of the dish is filled with floral decoration and scrolling vines. The edge is painted with a traditional yellow slip.* This dish was made in the Netherlands in the last quarter of the 18th century, circa 1780.

    Dimensions: 8.75″ diameter x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent

    *For an image of an 18th-century blue and white Delft dish with this yellow slip, see L-P van Geenen, Dutch Delftware, Marks and Factories page 237

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Made Netherlands circa 1770 Chinoiserie Decoration

    $960.00

    This blue and white Dutch Delft charger shows a chinoiserie scene in a lovely naive style. The chinoiserie scene in the center of the charger includes three unique viewpoints. On one side, we see a flower and buds in a vase. On the other side, we see stacks of water with pagodas at the water’s edge. The third image is a pair of mountains sketched below the two scenes. Seeing the three viewpoints at the same time is exciting.

    Dimensions: 13.5″ x 2.25″ height

    Condition: Excellent with slight edge frits invisibly restored

  • Antique Blue and White Delft Charger Hand-Painted in England circa 1765

    $1,200.00

    This lovely Delft charger was hand-painted in England in the mid-18th century, circa 1765. The center shows a naïve garden scene with a willow tree, an oversized flower, and a large blue bud. The border decoration echoes the center scene. It is likely that a senior artist made the outlines and then handed the plate over to someone else to fill in the straight line decoration. Nevertheless, the result is beautiful.

    Dimensions: 13″ in diameter x 2″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Hand Painted Mid-18th Century, Circa 1765

    $1,180.00

    This beautiful blue and white Dutch Delft charger shows a vibrant and detailed garden scene hand-painted in shades of cobalt blue. The decoration is crisp. The artist gave life to the well-painted scene by using a variety of shades of blue. Flowers spring from rockwork and fill the central space while a small butterfly hovers above. A butterfly with flowers is symbolic of love as butterflies love flowers. Along the border are five panels with simple floral decoration. The panels are separated by cross-hatching, known as “diamonds.”

    Dimensions: 14″ in diameter x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent: with small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Large Chinese Imari Porcelain Charger Made Qianlong Era Circa 1760

    $2,860.00

    This large Chinese Imari porcelain charger dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. Finely potted with a lovely rich, glassy, white glaze, the charger is hand-painted in a vivid Imari palette of orange-red, cobalt blue, and gold. We see chrysanthemums, lotus, and peony flowers in full bloom. The exquisite orange-red decoration is detailed and outlined in gold, which gives the design a luxurious look. On the underside, we see the artemisia leaf mark painted in underglaze blue within a traditional double ring. Typical of Chinese Imari ware in this period, the charger’s underside also bears a traditional sketch of two branches of plum blossoms.

    Dimensions: 14.15″ in diameter x 1.75″ in height

    Condition: a single edge chip invisibly restored

  • Blue and White Dutch Delft Charger 18th Century Made, Circa 1770

    $830.00

    This hand-painted Dutch Delft charger features a delightful, topsy turvy chinoiserie scene with a fresh point of view. We see a wall of blue rockwork stretching to a blue sky. Around and seemingly hanging from the rockwork is a flower-filled vine. Below that is a pagoda, then water, and a diminutive pagoda. The wide border is decorated with lovely floral designs.

    Dimensions: 13.75″

    Condition: Excellent with small edge fits invisibly restored

  • Pair New Hall Porcelain Hand Painted Dishes Made England Circa 1800

    $440.00

    This pair of New Hall Porcelain dishes features fabulous hand-painted flowers. The colors and the artistry are exquisite.

    The beautiful flowers are encircled with a thin line of gilt. The borders are decorated with impressed fruits and flowers. On each dish, the edge is trimmed in a purple “ribbon” that ends in a “bow.” Overall they are beautiful and sweet.

    Dimensions: 8.75″ long x 8″ wide.

    Condition: Excellent with several firing spots from when the glaze was thin in the firing.

  • Pair Sèvres Porcelain Tureens with Feuille-de-Choux Pattern Borders 18th Century

    $4,600.00

    Why We Love It!
    The flowers are so beautiful! The bouquets of pink peonies and other flowers are fabulous.

    Sèvres has been called the most important French porcelain manufacturer. We are delighted to offer for sale this exquisite pair of Sèvres soft-paste porcelain tureens made 1773-1782. Decorated with delicate polychrome flowers, it is marked with the exclusive royal cipher in underglaze puce (a crowned interlaced ‘L’ mark), the painter’s mark for Michel-Louis Chauveaux (active 1773–82).
    In 1751 Sèvres became the factory of the King of France, Louis XV.
    The factory produced a lovely white soft-paste porcelain decorated with natural painted flowers in various colors. Porcelains decorated in this style were the most important part of the Sèvres production, especially during the early years. Fine quality and elegant design made these porcelains highly sought after and expensive. Combinations of flowers, including roses, daisies, orange blossoms, violets, hyacinths from Holland, daffodils from Constantinople, lily of the valley, were all used to decorate Sèvres porcelains.
    The painting on our pair of small tureens is exceptional. Note how the polychrome colors of the flowers sink into the white, soft-paste porcelain (see image #2). If one compares the painting on these tureens to the painting on French hard-paste porcelains from later in the 18th-century, one sees that the colors on the hard-paste porcelains do not sink in but seem to rest on top of the porcelain.

    Dimensions: 4 1/4″ x 9 1/2″ x 6″ tall

    Condition: Excellent with some gilt expertly touched in on the unseen place at the top of each tureen where the cover sits (see image #7).

    * See “les porcelainiers du XVIIIe siècle français” with a preface by Serge Gauthier
    ** See “French 18th-century Porcelain at the Wadsworth Atheneum”
    by Linda Roth and Clare Le Corbeiller

  • Three First Period Worcester Brocade Pattern Dishes England circa 1775

    $3,480.00

    Known as the “Brocade” pattern, the design on these exquisite eighteenth-century dishes is complicated yet delicate. The inspiration for this pattern comes from seventeenth-century Japanese patterns. We see dragons, flowering prunus, and bolts of fabric with mons. The center has a sizeable gilt chrysanthemum flower head, and the border has a golden rim line with a lobed edge.
    Made by Worcester during the “First Period” when the factory was under the supervision of Dr. Wall circa 1770.
    The reverse of each dish with the Worcester gold crescent mark.
    Several years ago, we had in the shop a single dish in this model with the collection label for the Iman Smallwood Collection.
    Also see: Simon Spero and John Sandon in Worcester Porcelain, 1751-1790, The Zorensky Collection image #273 pg. 234 for an example of this pattern in a shell-shaped dish.
    Diameter: 8.25.”
    Condition: Excellent
    Price:
    $3,480 for the set of three dishes.
    $2,400 for the pair of round dishes.
    $1,180 for the heart-shaped dish.

  • Blue and White Delft Jar Hand-Painted Circa Circa 1780

    $1,730.00

    This large blue and white Delft jar is hand-painted showing beautiful flower-filled baskets on white tin-glazed ground.
    We see sunflowers and tulips overflowing baskets alongside floral decoration with scrolling vines.
    The ribbed body sits on a traditional octagonal base. The ribbing adds life to the decoration as light plays over the curves.
    Across the middle of the jar, we see a band of cobalt blue with panels of flowers.
    The underside of the jar has a typical 18th-century mark “2” used in the factory to denote this particular size and shape jar.

    Dimensions: 17″ tall x 8.5″ diameter x 5″ across base
    Condition: Excellent

  • Dutch Delft Garniture Five Pieces Polychrome Made Circa 1880

    $3,200.00

    This charming Dutch Delft garniture comprises two beaker vases and three baluster-form jars with their covers.
    It is in excellent condition.
    We see a romantic countryside scene with a shepherdess and sheep. Sitting comfortably in the shade of a large tree, she holds her staff and looks out onto a spacious grassy meadow.
    In the background, we see a castle turret to her left and a church and steeple on her right.
    The scene evokes the romantic feeling of the 18th century.
    To create the scene, the painter used soft earth tone colors: two shades of blue, green, iron-red, yellow, and manganese.
    The scene is bordered with a molded bright yellow and manganese cartouche with manganese flowers at the head and base. The reverse side of each vase has green leafy branches and red flowers. Each cover is painted with a yellow flower and surmounted by a traditional lion finial.

    Dimensions: The covered vases are 15″ tall x 7″ wide x 4.25″ deep at the base. The open vases are 10″ tall x 5.5″ wide x 3.75″ deep at the base.
    Condition Excellent: small edge frits are invisibly restored

  • Set of Ten Baby Blue Plates Made by Ridgway in England Circa 1830

    $1,100.00

    Ridgway made this set of ten lovely baby blue dessert plates in England circa 1830.
    The plates are impeccably styled: the baby blue is paired with crisp white porcelain and golden trim.
    The cool color palette of baby blue stands out on this elegant pattern.
    The bone china porcelain is of fine quality.
    The marks on the underside of the dishes show the distinctive Ridgway pattern number system using fractions painted in iron red.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter x .75″ height
    Condition: Each plate in the set is in excellent condition. Two plates have very slight rubbing to the gilded outer edge (see images).

  • Five Antique Chinese Porcelain Saucers Made Circa 1770

    $1,220.00

    This set of antique Chinese porcelain saucers features beautiful peonies hand-painted in monochrome purple.
    Peonies symbolize prosperity, good luck, love, and honor in Chinese tradition. The color purple symbolizes love and spiritual awareness.
    The saucers were made circa 1770, during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor.

    Dimensions: 4.3″ in diameter x 1″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century French Soft Paste Porcelain Mennecy Blush Pot Hand-Painted

    $1,600.00

    We are pleased to offer this beautiful Mennecy blush pot ‘Pot à Fard’ made circa 1750.
    It is decorated with sprays of flowers, the finial shaped as a single purple rose with green leaves.
    The flowers are hand-painted in rich enamel colors, among them the distinctive Mennecy purple-rose hue, shown in figure #1, especially on the rose form finial. Another color associated with Mennecy is the most beautiful green found on the raised leaves of the rose finial and on the leaves surrounding the flowers.
    This pot is particularly appealing because the painting of the flowers is so robust. Envisioning it in a woman’s toilette seems the epitome of femininity and Romanticism. In the 18th century, it would have been found on the vanity of an aristocratic lady, where it was primarily used to hold creams and lotions for the face.
    The Mennecy Porcelain Manufactory was one of the first French porcelain factories. From 1735 until 1773, the factory produced Fine quality soft-paste porcelain wares. French soft-paste porcelains date to the early attempts by European potters to replicate Chinese porcelain by using mixtures of clay and glass frit. Like our pot, the body of the early Mennecy soft-paste wares has a creamy tone.
    There was no gilding at Mennecy. Instead, like our pot, the rims were painted in tones of pink and purple.
    The Mennecy, factory under the protection of the Duc de Villeroy, marked many of its porcelains with an incised “DV” on the underside.
    Our pot is marked with an incised “DV”; however, an image of the “DV” mark does not have enough resolution to post here.

    Provenance: Estate of John F. Ball, Greenwich, CT.

    Dimensions: 3.75″ tall x 3″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Chinese Blue and White Small Vase Made of Soft-Paste Porcelain

    $760.00

    This delicate Chinese blue and white bud vase was made in the early 18th century circa 1720. Hand-painted in shades of cobalt blue, it shows peonies emanating from rockwork. The vase has an elegant, slender form that rises to a flared lotus form rim. It is supported on an oval-shaped foot. The body has a milky-white glaze, which crackled when fired (see image #s 2.5.6)

    Dimensions: 5″ in height x 2.6″ across x .8″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with the very, very slightest roughness on the upper edge.

  • Pair French 18th Century Soft-Paste Porcelain Pots Made by Mennecy

    $2,100.00

    Provenance: A New England Estate
    Hand-painted in the 18th century circa 1765 these beautiful Mennecy Porcelain soft-paste pomade pots are rare. Pots like this held rich creams and lotions for the face. They would have been placed on the vanity of an aristocratic lady. Both the body and the cover have lovely spiral fluting and are decorated with flowers painted in exquisite enamel colors, especially the distinctive purple-rose hue seen on the body and the cover. Each cover is topped with a fabulous strawberry finial. The underside of both pots is marked with an incised “DV.”

    Dimensions. height 3.75 inches x diameter 2.35 inches

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Charger 18th Century, Circa 1780

    $580.00

    Made in the last quarter of the 18th century, this Dutch Delft charger is decorated with deep cobalt blue on white ground. It has a floral center that forms a five-pointed star. Around the center is an elaborate floral and foliate border. The eye-catching design radiates outward from the center to the two bands of floral decoration. On the reverse is a typical 18th century Delft blue factory mark showing the number “5”.

    Dimensions: 13.5″ in diameter x 2″ height

    Condition: Several very small glaze flakes restored to the rim; scattered age typical glaze lines and a glaze skip from the making (see image #5).

  • Six Blue and White Chinese Porcelain Dishes Kangxi Era Made c-1700

    $5,800.00

    These six beautiful Chinese blue and white porcelain dishes were painted in the Kangxi era circa 1700. Hand-painted using both soft and dark cobalt blue, each dish is very slightly different from the others in the set. The decoration is exquisite. At the center of each dish, there are two flowering peonies emanating from rockwork. On the border surrounding the peonies are other flowers including chrysanthemums, and plum blossoms. These dishes have meaning in Chinese tradition. Peonies are much loved for their bold size and colors. They are known as the flower of “riches and honor.”* Chrysanthemums symbolize abundance, while plum blossoms symbolize endurance and hope*. The dishes are molded, and the border of each plate is fluted in a pattern similar to the petals on a flower. The total effect is delightful.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter x 1” in height

    Condition: Excellent with minor frits on the foot of each dish

    *See “Chinese Art A Guide to Motifs and Visual Imagery” by P B Welch.

  • Pair Creamware Dishes 18th Century England Painted in Pink & Purple Made c-1770

    $420.00

    We are pleased to offer this lovely pair of 18th century English creamware dishes made circa 1780. Decorated in enamels, both plates
    feature a chinoiserie scene. In conversation, we see two fashionably dressed women, a small child holding a pinwheel as he looks up, pointing to a group of chimes, and an older boy standing nearby. And at the far right, we see another boy seated with a parrot on his arm.
    Dimensions: 9.5 inches diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $420 for the pair
    History of creamware
    Creamware was created in the 1760s by Josiah Wedgwood. He was the first of the English potters to produce a cream-colored earthenware with a light-colored body. Wedgwood marketed these wares as Queensware after Queen Charlotte gave Wedgwood the honor of ordering a set. As its popularity increased, many of the other English potters began to make creamware as well. It replaced saltglaze stoneware as the dinnerware of all but the high aristocracy, which most likely would have had a service of Chinese export porcelain dishes.

  • Large Salt Glazed Charger 18th Century Made in England circa 1765

    $860.00

    Provenance: The Collection of Sir Samuel Hoare*
    This large and exquisite salt-glazed charger was made in Staffordshire, England, in the 18th century circa 1765. The design is elegant and straightforward: the only decoration is the lobed and gadrooned edge. Press-molded, salt-glazed chargers, plates, dishes, and other service pieces filled the cupboards and dining rooms of middle and upper-class English and American homes from the mid-1740s until the end of the 18th century. The advent of this white stoneware dinnerware instigated a tabletop revolution.

    Diameter: 15″

    *A paper label on the back of the charger (see image #6)
    **J Skerry “Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America.”
    ***For an image of this type of charger recovered archaeologically at Colonial Williamsburg, see J Skerry “Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America.” page 231.

  • Sevres Porcelain Bottle Cooler Hand-Painted 18th Century, Circa 1773-1782

    $3,860.00

    Sèvres was the royal factory of Louis XV and Louis XVI, Kings of France from 1715-1793. The Sèvres factory was known to have the best painters and gilders in 18th century France. This stunning Sèvres 18th century double bottle cooler was hand-painted with exquisite sprigs of spring flowers (see images). The underside is marked in underglaze blue with the Sèvres intertwined “L” and the letter “L” for painter’s mark for Michel-Louis Chavereaux, who was active at Sèvres from 1773-1782. The decoration is delicate, and the modeling and gilding are exceptional.

    The cooler measures 12.5″ (31.75 cm) across the handles x 5.75″ (14.6 cm) deep x 4.75″ (12 cm) in height.

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Pierced Creamware Charger by Leeds Pottery 18th Century England c-1785

    $2,300.00

    This magnificent creamware charger was made at the Leeds Pottery in Yorkshire, England, circa 1785.
    Hand-pressed from a mold, it has exquisite piercings and a beaded edge.
    Dimensions: 14.75″ in diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $2,300
    The underside is marked LEEDS POTTERY (impressed).
    For an image of this pattern on a Leeds Pottery plate, see image 571 on pg 144 in Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds by Peter Walton, where he notes “Yorkshire 1780s-1790s” for this creamware design.
    Please note that the last image in the series, which is hard to read, is the underside of the charger.

  • 18th Century Italian Doccia Porcelain Dinner Service

    $4,000.00

    A dinner service comprising six dinner dishes and six soup dishes made by the Doccia Porcelain Manufactory, circa 1750.

    Italy was the site of Europe’s first porcelain production: in Florence between 1575 and 1587 under the patronage of Francesco I de’ Medici. The Doccia Porcelain Manufactory, founded nearly 200 years later, continued the tradition of Italian porcelain with a hard-paste body that was later glazed with a tin glaze. This dinner set is decorated with the al tulipano motif, a design that is one of the most prevalent in Doccia wares. The central flower is not a tulip but an interpretation of the peonies used in the Chinese Famille Rose porcelain.

    Dimensions:
    – Soup dishes: 9 1/4 in. diameter x 1 1/2 in. height (23.1 cm diameter x 3.8 cm height)
    – Dinner dishes: 9 1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. height (23.1 cm diameter x 2.4 cm height)

    Condition: Excellent. Light wear to enamels throughout commensurate with age and use. Faint use marks visible on some dishes. One dinner plate with chip to underside of rim measuring 1 cm.

    Note: 1 dinner dish and 2 soup dishes are not transparent, a characteristic of porcelain. These 3 dishes are porcelain with a tin glaze which makes them opaque and dates them to 1790-1800.

  • Early Derby Porcelain Coffee Can att. to George Robertson, circa 1795

    $3,200.00

    A green-ground porcelain coffee can made by the Derby Porcelain Factory circa 1795. This green-ground coffee can is a fine example of early Derby porcelain. The shipwreck scene, titled on the bottom “A Shipwreck after a Storm” in hand-written script, is attributed to the painter George Robertson. The gilding, executed by Joseph Stables, remains in pristine condition.

    Condition: Excellent. Small rim chip measuring 0.4 cm with associated in-painting of gilt.

    Dimensions: 2 1/2 in. H x 2 7/8 in. Dm (6.4 cm H x 6.9 cm Dm)

    Provenance:
    Private English collection
    Mellors & Kirk, Nottingham, 4/30/2009, lot 106
    Thence by family descent

  • Set of Six Large Blue and White Delft Chargers Hand-Painted 18th-Century

    $7,400.00

    This group makes a true blue statement. The deep cobalt blue is fabulous!  This set of six Dutch Delft chargers are hand-painted in the “Theeboom” pattern showing a tea plant with a fan-shaped bouquet of leaves and flowers. This is one of the most exquisite hand-painted designs made on Delft chargers in the 18th century, which explains why it was so popular. The pattern is lush and full of color. The deep blue decoration fills the charger. On the border are floral decorations and scroll designs. The white edges are delicately scalloped, adding another beautiful dimension to each charger. The chargers have the mark of De Klaauw “The Claw” for Delft made in the last quarter of the 18th century, or for LPK for De Porceleyne Lampetkan 1778-1811.     For an image and discussion of a group of Delft chargers with this pattern, see E B Schapp, Delft Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art pages 74 and 75.

    Dimensions: 13.5″-14.25″ in diameter        Condition: Excellent with very small edge frits invisibly restored            Price: $7,400 for the group

  • Wedgwood Creamware Platter or Charger 18th Century Made in England Circa 1785

    $265.00

    This Wedgwood creamware round platter or charger was made in 18th century England circa 1785. The border is decorated with a traditional neoclassical design of iron-red flower heads connected by midnight brown “diamonds”.

    Diameter: 12″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Mantle Jar Hand-Painted 18th Century Netherlands Circa 1780

    $1,220.00

    A blue and white Dutch Delft mantle jar hand-painted in exquisite deep cobalt blue. We see a peacock in a garden filled with flowers and ferns. The cover is similarly decorated and topped with a traditional round knop covered in blue. Made in the Netherlands circa 1780, jars like this would have been placed on a mantle or a bracket.

    Dimensions: Height 12.25″ x diameter at widest point 5.25″ x diameter at base 3.5″

    Condition: Excellent with small edge chips invisibly restored. The underside is partially glazed, which was the tradition in many 18th century Delft factories.

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Hand-Painted in Netherlands 18th Century Circa 1780

    $1,100.00

    This blue and white Dutch Delft charger was hand-painted circa 1780. The center of the charger is decorated with a large flower. Beyond the center, we see flowers that seem to follow one another around in a circle actively. The vibrant decoration draws your eye from the center outward.

    Dimensions: diameter 13.75″

    Condition: Very Good (with small edge chips invisibly restored)

  • 18th Century Faience Puppy Made in Brussels circa 1760

    $2,200.00

    WHY WE LOVE IT: His attitude!
    We are pleased to offer this 18th century Brussels Faience figure of a puppy naturalistically modeled, painted with floppy ears, bulging eyes, and a topknot. He is seated on a green rectangular base. This charming puppy will make a wonderful addition to any dog lover’s home. Requiring little care except for an occasional dusting.

  • Pair Blue and White Delft Dishes Hand-Painted, Circa 1780

    $865.00

    A pair of blue and white Dutch Delft dishes hand-painted in the chinoiserie style. The center of each dish shows two flowering plants in full bloom. Look closely, and you will see that all the painting is done in lines as if by pen or pencil. This suggests that an experienced painter outlined the images, which an apprentice or less experienced painter then filled in. The delicate lobed edges are the final touch that makes these dishes especially wonderful.

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent with small edge frits invisibly restored.

  • Chinese Porcelain Plate Hand-Painted with Mandarin Ducks, Circa 1860

    $1,230.00

    This beautiful mid 19th-century Chinese plate was hand-painted in the Famille Rose style in the  Qing dynasty, circa 1860. The plate depicts two Mandarin ducks swimming on a lotus pond. They look at each other and seem to smile. This is a happy plate with a symbolic message. Mandarin ducks are thought to mate for life. Therefore, in Chinese lore, they represent a happy marriage. In the Qianlong period, this would have been a perfect wedding gift! The plate is finely painted in exquisite polychrome enamels. We see pink shading into lavender pink and blue shading into light blue and turquoise. Highlights of grey, yellow, green, and light brown with gilt are framed by waveforms in bright white. On the border, we see the eight Chinese immortals, some riding wonderful mythical beasts. On the reverse of the plate are three traditional iron-red flower sprays.

    Dimensions: diameter 8.75.”

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Hand-Painted, Netherlands, 18th Century, Circa 1760

    $945.00

    The entire surface of this beautiful blue and white Dutch Delft charger is covered in deep cobalt blue coloring. The center of the charger is filled with hand-painted peonies; while the wide border is painted with a net-like pattern of peonies, leaves, and scrolling vines. This charger was made in the Netherlands in the mid-18th century, circa 1760.

    Dimensions: 12″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Antique Faience Cabbage Form Soup Tureen Hand-Painted in Brussels Circa 1765

    $18,700.00

    This faience soup tureen was made in the Philippe Mombaers factory in Brussels circa 1765; the cabbage tureen, its cover, and stand are painted in green tones with yellow highlights. The color combination is exquisite. The tureen is a gem of naturalism. Beautifully molded, the cabbage sits on a stand formed by cabbage leaves. The finial is in the form of a snail. Practiced gardeners know that snails are often found in the cabbage patch late in the growing season. A snail munching on this faience cabbage would have delighted the dinner guests when the soup tureen was presented at the table. Tureens in vegetable and animal forms were the height of a fashionable table setting in the Louis XV period.

    Dimensions: 14″ diameter of base x 9″ tall        Condition: Very Good. The snail’s antennae are restored. There are some very tiny losses to the glaze. There is a very fine, thin, professionally sealed hairline on the edge of the cover (See image #7). It can only be seen from the inside.

  • Large Blue & White Delft Charger Hand-Painted w/ Cobalt Blue 18th Century c-1760

    $1,630.00

    A huge blue and white Delft charger hand-painted in cobalt blue with peonies encircling a central flower.
    Made in the Netherlands circa 1760, the charger is decorated all over with flowers arranged in a floral pattern (see image #2)
    The reverse of the charger is decorated with nine panels in the style of early to mid 18th century Delft.

    Dimensions: diameter 15.5″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Dutch Delft Dish Made, Circa 1760

    $950.00

    Why we love it: The cobalt blue is exquisite!
    Provenance: An identical dish is in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. For an image of this identical plate and a discussion of its origins, see: E B Schaap “Delft Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art” pages 74 and 75.
    We are pleased to offer this Dutch Delft dish in the “Theeboom” pattern showing a tea plant with a fan-shaped bouquet of leaves and flowers. It was quite popular in the mid-18th century. The decoration fills the well of the charger. On the border are medallions and floral designs. The edges are delicately scalloped, which adds another beautiful dimension to the dish.

    Dimensions: 10 inches diameter

    Condition: Excellent

    We also have a selection of 13″-14″ diameter chargers in this pattern in the shop.

  • Blue and White Dutch Delft Charger Hand-Painted, Circa 1770

    $760.00

    We are pleased to offer this Dutch Delft blue and white charger showing a pair of songbirds and a vase overflowing with flowers. It is hand-painted in deep cobalt blue on a bright white ground. The charger was made in the last quarter of the 18th century circa 1770.

    ‘Dimensions: 10.5″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent with tiny edge frits along the outer edge invisibly restored.

  • Antique Delft Dishes a Set of Five 18th Century with Purple/Manganese Coloring

    $1,100.00

    A set of five antique Dutch Delft dishes beautifully painted with manganese-based purple. The dishes show a peony plant in full bloom. The maker was Hugo Brouwer. Brouwer created the design, and each dish would have been hand-painted in his factory, The Dreye Porceleyne Flesschen, using a stencil of his design. Each dish is signed with Brouwer’s H-B mark.

    Dimensions: diameter 9″.        Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of Blue and White Dutch Delft Vases Made, 18th Century circa 1760

    $4,300.00

    This pair of blue and white Dutch Delft vases was hand-painted in cobalt blue. The exquisite blue decoration features an all-around scene in the “Thousand Flowers” style of the 18th century, circa 1760. Each vase shows a songbird In the midst of flowers, leaves, and scrolling vines. The design is lively, and the painting is beautifully done. The quality of the glaze is exceptional. The softly rounded octagonal shape of the vases is traditional to Dutch Delft. This pair was made by and has the mark of “The Three Gilded Ashcans.” A similar pair can be found in the Philadelphia Museum collection in the Bradbury Bedell Memorial Collection 1921-3-159, 160. Place these vases in a room with other colors, and something magical happens; all the colors in the room come out more sharply.

    Dimensions: 10.75 inches tall x 5 inches at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent with very small edge frits invisibly restored.

  • Pair of Antique Blue and White Dutch Delft Dishes Hand-Painted, Circa 1770

    $980.00

    This pair of antique blue and white Dutch Delft hand-painted dishes were made circa 1770. They feature a garden scene showing oversized flowers and a border with flowering vines and a crisscross design on a blue ground.

    Dimensions: 8.65″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent with small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Antique Blue and Gold Pair of English Porcelain Dishes Regency Period, c-1790

    $480.00

    This pair of English late 18th-century porcelain dishes is hand-painted in blue and gold with geometric and floral patterns on the border. The gold is the thing with this pair of dishes. It is fabulous! The gold-work jumps off the porcelain-especially the gold dots inside the blue enamel painting and the gilded vine curling around the blue line.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Hand-Painted Antique Blue & Gold English Porcelain Dish 18th Century c-1780

    $430.00

    This exquisite late 18th-century dish features several elements that make it so full of life. First is the splendid hand-painted goldwork. This gilding enlivens the dish with its hand-painted golden vines, leaves, and edge. Additionally, the lovely fluting across the entire wide rim makes the design dance in the light. The delicate blue flowers coupled with the six blue lines add to the dishes’ beautiful sense of movement. The underside of the dish is marked with the Caughley “S” mark (For Salopian)

    Dimensions: 8.25″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent with the very, very slightest wear to the gilt

  • Antique English Soft Paste Porcelain Liverpool Coffee Pot 18th Century

    $700.00

    We are pleased to offer this rare Liverpool soft-paste porcelain coffee pot made in England in the late 18th century, circa 1785. The pot is painted with a lovely chinoiserie scene on both sides of the body. In the scene, a lady stands in front of a blossoming plum tree. She offers a basket of sweets to two boys. The artisan skillfully integrated chinoiserie figures into the design to add exotic appeal in an era when China was still a distant land of mystery.

    Dimensions: 10.5″ tall x 8.5″ deep x 5″ wide
    Condition: Very good with a single fine short hairline (see images).

  • Pair of Large Blue and White Delft Chargers Made, circa 1780

    $2,400.00

    We are pleased to offer this pair of large blue and white Delft chargers made by and with the mark of “The Claw” factory in the Netherlands, in the 18th century, circa 1780. The design is exuberant – as though the artist wanted to fill the entire space with delightful motifs. In the center is a vase overflowing with curving branches of leaves and flowers, but beyond this are much more stylized elements repeated around the entire dish. We see rows of fruits or berries, leaves, daisies, flowerpots holding roses, and large fanciful blossoms around the rim. Everything is connected with stripes, spirals, circles and scrolls to make a harmonious whole, a feast for the eyes.

    These chargers will work well in a traditional or contemporary home.

    This pair is part of our large collection of blue and white Dutch Delft, which can be viewed here.

    Dimensions: 14 inches diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of 18th Century Ludwigsburg Dishes

    $680.00

    From the Collection of Mario Buatta
    Mario loved flowers and he loved well-painted flowers on porcelain.

    This pair of Ludwigsburg dishes was made in Germany circa 1780. The outstanding quality of the hand-painted flowers is their exquisite liveliness. The flowers on the two plates are bursting with life! Hand-painted in monochrome purple each plate has a beautiful floral bouquet in the center and smaller sprigs of flowers decorating the plate as if they were strewn about.

    The material is hard-paste porcelain.

    Both dishes have the 18th-century factory mark of Ludwigsburg Porcelain which was two “C”s interlocked in blue, with one reversed, with a ducal coronet above as can be seen in images 7 and 8.

    Dimensions: 9.25” diameter

    Condition: Excellent

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