Dutch Delft Blue and White Horse 18th Century Made circa 1780

$4,250.00

Description

Provenance: Collection Vecht Amsterdam
We are proud to present this lovely 18th century, circa 1780, Dutch Delft blue and white spotted horse modeled prancing on a rectangular blue base. His ears point straight up; his head tilts slightly to one side as though he hears something. A floral design on the saddle blanket repeats along the side of the base. The horseshoes on the raised hooves are a special small detail. The horse’s extra long tail was made to stabilize the model.
The underside of the base is indented in the 18th century fashion.
Dimensions: 5.5 long x 7″ tall x 2.25″ wide
Condition: Excellent
Price: $4250
Background of Delft:
By the middle of the 15th century potters from southern Europe migrated through France to the Netherlands, and the earthenware industry became well established in Antwerp.
In the second half of the 16th century, under religious pressure, many of these Protestant artisans were forced to leave Antwerp. Most moved to the northern Netherlands.
The rise of the potting industry in the northern Netherlands occurred simultaneously with the decline of the beer brewing industry in the town of Delft. As the Delft brewers ceased production, their large abandoned buildings on the canals were quickly occupied by the pottery factories which could utilize the large spaces and the canals for the transportation of their raw materials and finished wares.
In the middle of the 17th century a war in China interrupted the production of Chinese blue and white porcelains to Europe. The potters in Delft were able to fill the void in the market, and they began producing tin-glazed earthenwares in the style of Chinese porcelain.
Within the next century and a half, the Delft pottery-makers became increasingly successful, and their range of styles broadened to include European subjects and other original styles.
At the height of production the city of Delft counted over 30 factories. So successful were the Delft factories that many factories across Europe and especially in England across the Channel began to produce delftware.