Imari & Imari-Inspired Porcelain

Showing all 10 results

  • Two Chinese Imari Porcelain Chargers Hand-Painted Qianlong Era, Circa 1760

    $6,140.00

    These two beautiful Chinese Imari chargers were hand-painted in the Qianlong era in the mid-18th century. Both chargers show floral designs painted in cobalt blue, iron-red, and gold. The charger showing the basket of flowers in the center is also colored with peach enamels. Each charger is a work of art.

    #1 (the charger higher up in the first image):
    This large Chinese Imari porcelain charger dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. Finely potted with a lovely rich, glassy white glaze, the charger is hand-painted in a vivid Imari palette of orange-red, cobalt blue, and gold. We see chrysanthemums, lotus, and peony flowers in full bloom. The exquisite orange-red decoration is detailed and outlined in gold, which gives the design a luxurious look. On the underside, we see the artemisia leaf mark painted in underglaze blue within a traditional double ring. Typical of Chinese Imari ware in this period, the charger’s underside also bears a traditional sketch of two branches of plum blossoms.

    Dimensions: 14.15″ in diameter x 1.75″ in height.

    Condition: Very good with a single small edge chip invisibly restored to the highest standard.

    Price: $2,860

    #2 (the charger lower down in the first image):
    This large Chinese porcelain charger is hand-painted in the Imari style. It dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. The charger has a vivid palette of iron-red, peach, underglaze cobalt blue, and gold. In the center, we see a basket overflowing with flowers: chrysanthemums, peonies, and plum tree flowers, all in full bloom. The decoration is beautifully gilded, which gives the design a luxurious touch. The broad rim of the dish is adorned with scrolling vines, flowers, and far-away waterside views. In Chinese tradition, peonies symbolize royalty, wealth, and honor, plum tree flowers symbolize endurance, and chrysanthemums symbolize abundance and long life. Typical of the Chinese Imari ware at that time, the back of the charger bears a sketch of two branches of plum blossoms. At the center, the reverse shows the lingzhi mark in underglaze blue inside a double blue circle.

    Dimensions: 13.75″ diameter x 1.5″ height.

    Condition: Excellent with very slight rubbing to the gilt

    Price: $3,280

    The price for the pair of chargers is $6,140.

  • Set of Six Admiral Nelson Pattern Plates English Imari by Coalport Circa 1815

    $2,800.00

    Why we love it: The intensity of the Imari colors and the fabulous pink spotted lion. This set of Coalport Admiral Nelson dishes was hand-painted in England during the Regency period circa 1815. To see the wonderful hand-painting, look, for example, at the difference between the lions in images #5 and #6. The plates are decorated in a traditional, vibrant Imari palette: richly gilded and painted in cobalt blue and iron red. The central scene shows a classic Imari image of a vase on a garden terrace. But, the decoration also offers us a whimsical pink lion and turquoise waterbirds. These were never seen in Japanese Imari (the pink lion is on the right side of each dish, and the green waterbirds are on the left side). The lion and the waterbirds are the distinguishing characteristics of the Coalport Admiral Nelson pattern.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ in diameter x 1″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Imari Chinese Porcelain Charger 18th Century circa 1760

    $3,200.00

    Why we love it: Look at the image!
    This beautiful Chinese porcelain charger is hand-painted in the Imari style. It dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. The charger has a vivid palette of iron-red, peach, underglaze cobalt blue, and gold. In the center, we see a basket overflowing with flowers: chrysanthemums, peonies, and plum tree flowers, all in full bloom. The decoration is beautifully gilded, which gives the design a luxurious touch. The broad rim of the dish is adorned with scrolling vines, flowers, and far-away waterside views. In Chinese tradition, peonies symbolize royalty, wealth, and honor, plum tree flowers symbolize endurance, and chrysanthemums symbolize abundance and long life. Typical of the Chinese Imari ware at that time, the back of the charger bears a sketch of two branches of plum blossoms. At the center the reverse shows the lingzhi mark in underglaze blue inside a double blue circle.

    Dimensions: 13.75″ diameter x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent with very slight rubbing to the gilt

  • Large Chinese Imari Porcelain Charger Made Qianlong Era Circa 1760

    $2,860.00

    This large Chinese Imari porcelain charger dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. Finely potted with a lovely rich, glassy, white glaze, the charger is hand-painted in a vivid Imari palette of orange-red, cobalt blue, and gold. We see chrysanthemums, lotus, and peony flowers in full bloom. The exquisite orange-red decoration is detailed and outlined in gold, which gives the design a luxurious look. On the underside, we see the artemisia leaf mark painted in underglaze blue within a traditional double ring. Typical of Chinese Imari ware in this period, the charger’s underside also bears a traditional sketch of two branches of plum blossoms.

    Dimensions: 14.15″ in diameter x 1.75″ in height

    Condition: a single edge chip invisibly restored

  • Pair Imari Ice Pails Hand-Painted in Admiral Nelson Pattern England Circa 1810

    $16,300.00

    Coalport Porcelain made this fabulous pair of Admiral Nelson pattern ice pails circa 1810.   The intensity of the Imari colors on the Admiral Nelson pattern is quite remarkable. It is the epitome of Regency decoration.  Hand-painted in England, they are decorated in a traditional, vibrant Imari palette: richly gilded and painted in cobalt blue and iron red.  The decoration is designed in horizontal bands. The scene on the lower part of the tureen shows a traditional Imari image of a vase on a garden terrace. The band above shows a waterside scene with whimsical turquoise water birds, which were never seen in Japanese Imari. The turquoise birds and the pink accents are the distinguishing characteristics of the Coalport Admiral Nelson pattern. The coolers are made of three pieces. The body, the cover, and a liner to hold ice (see image #7).

    Dimensions: 11″ tall x 10″ across the handles x 8.5″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent with some very slight wear to the gilt .

  • Pair Japanese Imari Jars Made in the Meiji Period, Circa 1880

    $3,460.00

    Hand-painted in Imari designs, both jars show beautiful waterside scenes in cobalt blue, gilt, and two tones of iron red. The colors are exquisite and intense. We see water lilies, lotus, peonies, and bellflowers. One jar shows a shoreline the other a cresting wave. Above the main scene on each jar is a medallion with gilded floral decoration. Around the shoulder and the base of each jar is a ring of decoration inspired by Japanese textiles. The hand-painted panels on the reverse echo the panels on the front of the jars but with many subtle changes (see image #8). On the side of each jar, we see a traditional Imari image of a vase on the garden terrace. The pair were made in Japan in the Meiji Period, circa 1880.

    Dimensions: 15″ tall x 7″ diameter at the widest point.

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Set of 11 Early Spode Ironstone Imari Dessert Dishes Made circa 1815

    $1,650.00

    A set of 11 Imari style ironstone dessert dishes, made by Spode circa 1815.

    Josiah Spode II began producing stone china in 1813 as an alternative to porcelain. Stone china, also known as ironstone due to its hard and durable fabric, became famous for its porcelain-like greyish blue glaze and glassy surface. So popular was this new medium that Queen Charlotte purchased her own stone china service from Spode’s Portugal Street showroom. These dessert dishes are early examples of Spode Stone China; in 1822 the company introduced an improved body marketed as “New Stone,” and thereafter items were branded as such.

    Dishes are marked with pattern number 2283 in iron red and feature the printed Spode Stone China mark in underglaze blue.

    Dimensions: 8 in. Dm x 1/2 in. H (20.3 cm Dm x 1.4 cm H)

    Condition: Excellent overall. Light wear to some enamels and gilding on dishes commensurate with age and use. The plates with the least and most amounts of wear are pictured.

  • Early 19th Century Spode Porcelain Regency Punch Bowl

    $4,000.00

    An early Spode Regency style punch bowl made circa 1810 and decorated in an Imari palette of deep blue, iron red, light peach, green with gilt details. The bowl features beautifully hand-painted floral decorations and an early Spode mark with the pattern number 1645 hand-painted on the base in iron red.

    Condition: Very good. Light scratching in well of the bowl from original use.

    Dimensions: 4 3/4 in H x 11 in D (12 cm H x 28.3 cm D)

    References: Smithsonian, National Museum of American History, 225282.

  • Pair of Imari Tobacco Leaf Saucers

    $520.00

    From the Collection of Mario Buatta
    Mario loved beautiful combinations of colors. This pair of English Tobacco Leaf pattern saucers have Imari colors which are exquisite. The saucers have a vivid palette of orange red, cobalt blue, and gold. The cobalt coloring is outlined in gold which gives the design a luxurious touch.

    Dimensions: 5.5 inches diameter

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Coalport Admiral Nelson Pattern Centerpiece, England, circa 1810

    $1,200.00

    WHY WE LOVE IT:  The intensity of the Imari colors and the wonderful pink spotted lion.

    This Coalport Admiral Nelson pattern centerpiece was hand painted in England during the Regency period circa 1810. It is decorated in a traditional, vibrant Imari palette. It is richly gilded and painted in cobalt blue and iron red. The in the well the central scene shows a traditional Imari image of a vase on a garden terrace. But, the border of shows a whimsical pink lion and turquoise water birds which were never seen in Japanese Imari (the lion is on the left side the waterbirds are on the right). They are the distinguishing characteristics of the Coalport Admiral Nelson pattern.

    Dimensions: 13″ wide x 8.5″ deep x 5″ height

    Condition: Excellent.

Showing all 10 results