Creamware

Showing all 24 results

  • Pair of French Mid-19th Century Flower Decorated Creamware Dishes

    $470.00

    This pair of French creamware dishes shows sprigs of beautiful flowers. The images are crisp. We see two shades of purple, green, and yellow. The color combination is perfect. Made by the Creil-Montereau factory in the mid-19th century, circa 1860, the pattern was inspired by the hand-painted flowers on 18th-century French and English porcelain. The dishes are made of pearled creamware, pottery perfected by an Englishman, Josiah Wedgwood, in the 1780s. Under the artistic and technical direction of native English potters, Creil-Montereau introduced France to transfer printing on creamware and raised it to a high state of perfection during its peak years in the 19th century. The pottery factory of Creil (Oise) was founded in 1797. In 1840 the Creil factory merged with the Montereau factory (Seine et Marne). The company became “Creil et Montereau Faïenceries” under the name Lebeuf, Milliet & Co. (LM & Co.), and continued until 1876.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter x 1.5″ deep.

    Condition: Excellent with the very, very slightest rubbing to the colors.

  • Pair Antique Dishes Elephants Image Shows One of Two

    $530.00

    We are pleased to offer this pair of antique English dishes showing an elephant in an Asian setting (see image # 3 to see both dishes in the pair side by side). Made circa 1800, these octagonal pearl glazed creamware dishes feature a lively scene with two figures riding an Indian elephant through an exotic landscape. The combination of several “Asian” style motifs was a common theme in 19th century England. Along a winding road, we see large fruit trees and fenced gardens. The road leads into the distance, where we see a tall pagoda temple.
    The pattern is printed in brown with overglaze enameling in orange, yellow, green, and blue.
    The dishes are unmarked but are similar to the later Wedgwood & Co. “Processional Elephant and Howdah” pattern made in the mid-19th century. Minnie Holdaway suggests that these dishes were the inspiration for the later Wedgwood & Co. pattern since they date to the early 19th century.
    Dimensions: 9 inches diameter x 1 inch height
    Condition: Excellent                 Price: $530 for the pair of dishes
    References: Holdaway, Minnie. The Wares of Ralph Wedgwood. English Ceramic Circle Transactions Vol. 12 Part 3. London: The Lincoln’s Inn Press Ltd, 1986.

  • Pair of Crazy Cow Antique Creamware Dishes England circa 1810

    $830.00

    We are pleased to offer this pair of dishes in the popular Crazy Cow pattern.
    Made by Minton circa 1810, the pearl-glazed creamware dishes are hand-painted in bright colors featuring a dragon-like mythical animal in the central rondel. This is a lively, whimsical pattern.

    Dimensions: 10.5 inches x 7.25 inches

    Condition: Excellent

     

  • Pair Creamware Dishes 18th Century England Painted in Pink & Purple Made c-1770

    $720.00

    We are pleased to offer this lovely pair of 18th century English creamware dishes made circa 1780. Decorated in enamels, both plates
    feature a chinoiserie scene. In conversation, we see two fashionably dressed women, a small child holding a pinwheel as he looks up, pointing to a group of chimes, and an older boy standing nearby. And at the far right, we see another boy seated with a parrot on his arm.
    Dimensions: 9.5 inches diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $720 for the pair
    History of creamware
    Creamware was created in the 1760s by Josiah Wedgwood. He was the first of the English potters to produce a cream-colored earthenware with a light-colored body. Wedgwood marketed these wares as Queensware after Queen Charlotte gave Wedgwood the honor of ordering a set. As its popularity increased, many of the other English potters began to make creamware as well. It replaced saltglaze stoneware as the dinnerware of all but the high aristocracy, which most likely would have had a service of Chinese export porcelain dishes.

  • Large Pierced Creamware Charger by Leeds Pottery 18th Century England c-1785

    $2,300.00

    This magnificent creamware charger was made at the Leeds Pottery in Yorkshire, England, circa 1785.
    Hand-pressed from a mold, it has exquisite piercings and a beaded edge.
    Dimensions: 14.75″ in diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $2,300
    The underside is marked LEEDS POTTERY (impressed).
    For an image of this pattern on a Leeds Pottery plate, see image 571 on pg 144 in Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds by Peter Walton, where he notes “Yorkshire 1780s-1790s” for this creamware design.
    Please note that the last image in the series, which is hard to read, is the underside of the charger.

  • Large Mochaware Mug with Wavy Line Slip Decoration England Circa 1820

    $3,400.00

    Made in England circa 1820, this beauty has a lively design. The large center band is decorated with wavy lines of white slip over a band of milk chocolate colored slip.
    Above and below the main band are blue bands of slip, and just below the top edge is a band of green glazed impressed herringbone design.
    Dimensions: 6″ tall x 4.25″ diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $3,400

  • Mochaware Pitcher Mocha Ware Milk Chocolate Color Made England Circa 1815

    $1,360.00

    This mochaware pitcher is decorated with bands of lovely milk chocolate-colored slip.
    This color works beautifully with the unpainted creamware body of the handle and interior of the pitcher.
    Just below the top edge, we see a band of black and white rouletting, and above the bottom edge is a similar black and white rouletted band.
    Dimensions: 5.75″ tall x 4″ at the widest point
    Condition: Good: two short hairlines of approximately half an inch are seen on either side of the top edge. There is a hairline on the underside which does not go through.
    Price: $1360
    Background of Mochaware: Mochaware pottery is slip-decorated, lathe-turned, earthenware with bands of colored slip applied to buff-colored or white bodies

  • Wedgwood Creamware Platter or Charger 18th Century Made in England Circa 1785

    $365.00

    This Wedgwood creamware round platter or charger was made in 18th century England circa 1785. The border is decorated with a traditional neoclassical design of iron-red flower heads connected by midnight brown “diamonds”.

    Diameter: 12″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Odd Fellows Creamware Pitcher Very Large England Circa 1850

    $1,640.00

    This very large creamware pitcher is fully decorated with the imagery and symbols of the Odd Fellows (see images).
    Odd Fellows promote philanthropy, the ethic of reciprocity, and charity.
    At the front of the pitcher, we see a panel with the words “We are odd Fellows When we act and Do the  thing which is Right.”
    Around this panel are the words “How grand in Age How fair in Youth is Holly Friendship, Love and Truth.”
    Above the panel is an open palm with a heart symbolic of charity given from the heart.
    On both sides of the pitcher is the Odd Fellows motto, “Amicitia Amor et Veritas,”; which translates to Friendship, Love, and Truth.
    The motto is seen together with an image of Lady Justice and an angel holding a budding branch. Lady Justice personifies morality in judicial systems. The budding branch symbolizes the idea that truth can “draw freshness and verdure” from the “most barren facts and common things in life” and give them life and interest.
    Above all of this is a shining sun. As the sun shines on us all, it symbolizes impartiality in the benevolence of the Odd Fellows.

    Dimensions: 9.75″ tall x 8.25″ diameter
    Condition: An invisible restoration to the underside of the vase, only, and some scratching, particularly to the lustered leaves and the flowers and the lustered top edge.

  • A Large Mochaware Mug With Rare Combed Down Rows of Slip

    $3,300.00

    An exceptional mochaware mug with rare combed-down slip decoration. The renowned expert on Mocaware, Jonathan Rickard, lists this type of decoration in “Mocha and Related Dipped Wares 1770-1939” in a section entitled “Combinations and Other Oddities”, pages 106-121. According to Rickard “A further enhancement of the marbling process involved the use of a tool that functioned much like a comb by dragging the toothed tool through the wet marbling in a … constant direction”. The resulting decoration is exquisite. The handle of the mug has lovely foliate terminals. The top and bottom of the mug are each decorated with three bands of blue slip.                                                                                                                                                                                    The managers of mochaware factories often only specified the style of the work but gave each turner some freedom regarding the choice of design and colors. With rare exceptions, each piece of mochaware is unique.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Height: 6″

    Condition: Very slight wear to the bottom edge and handle, a very small flake on the handle see image #4 —a few very small firing and slip turning defects as originally made (see images).

  • Pair of Large Wedgwood Bowls Made in England, circa 1820

    $465.00

    A pair of large Wedgwood bowls their borders painted with a lovely, delicate vine with lavender and lavender-pink flowers and green leaves. They are simple, understated, and beautiful. The underside of each bowl is marked with an impressed “WEDGWOOD” and “DD” and “No 1106″ written in underglaze blue (1106 is the Wedgwood pattern #).

    Dimensions: The bowls measure 10.25″ diameter x 2” deep.

    Condition: Excellent with very slight crazing from the initial firing.

  • Pair of 18th Century Swansea Creamware Botanical Dishes

    $1,500.00

    From the Private Collection of Mario Buatta
    This pair of 18th-century botanical dishes is part of the private collection of Mario Buatta. This is an especially lovely pair of dishes. Mario loved the beautiful flowers painted on English botanical dishes. He was our very best client for four decades. Just after the very successful Sotheby’s sale Bardith was privileged to purchase items from his estate.
    This pair of 18th-century hand-painted creamware dishes was made by Swansea in Wales circa 1790. Dishes showing a single botanical flower were especially popular in late 18th century Great Britain as the scientific revolution began and British ships traveled the world often returning with new and unique specimens of flowers.
    The Swansea factory in Wales provided some of the very finest botanicals painted on dishes.
    The designs for these dishes were taken from Curtis’s Botanical Magazine begun in 1787.
    On the back of the dish is the name of the flower inscribed in iron red.
    Each dish is named on the back in underglaze red:
    The pair of dishes measure 7.75″ diameter.
    On the reverse, they are named: “Two Leave’d Lady’s Sliper” and “Virgin’s Bower”
    London…”

    Condition: Excellent

    For an image of similar Swansea Botanical dishes See: Jonathan Gray “The Cambrian Company, Swansea Pottery in London…”

  • Mochaware Mug Made by J.& R Clews at the Cobridge Factory, England, circa 1820

    $1,800.00
  • Apt Mixed Earths Centerpiece Made in France Mid-19th Century circa 1840

    $3,600.00
  • Twelve Creamware Dinner Dishes Yellow Borders Made circa 1800

    $2,700.00
  • Small Brown Mochaware Mug Made in England circa 1820

    $800.00
  • Creamware Mochaware Bowl Decorated with Trees circa 1800

    $2,600.00
  • English Creamware Racing Horse by Leeds Pottery

    $9,600.00
  • English Pottery Shell Shaped Dish with Yellow Ground

    $600.00
  • Pair of 18th Century Creamware Lions

    $4,600.00
  • Large Set of Wedgwood Creamware Dinner Plates with Thistle Design

    $3,300.00

    We are pleased to offer this set of 30 Wedgwood creamware dinner plates with a thistle design. These English creamware dinner plates date to the late 19th century. They have a lovely, simple design decorated with flowering thistle boughs done in the japonisme style. Japonisme involved Western arts with a Japanese aesthetic focused on asymmetrical compositions, and elements of color and line.
    Made circa 1880, the back of each dish is stamped “Wedgwood.”

    Dimensions: The plates measure a generous 9.85 inches in diameter.

    Condition: Excellent

    Price: $1,800 per dozen – These dishes can be purchased as a group or by the dozen. Please contact us for more information.

  • English Creamware 18th Century Sweetmeat Platt Menage

    $23,000.00
  • Pair of Antique Creamware Wall Pockets

    $1,900.00
  • Pair of 18th C. Creamware English Flower Holders

    $4,300.00

Showing all 24 results