Creamware

Showing all 54 results

  • Pair of Creamware Arcaded Plates England Circa 1820

    $460.00

    This pair of elegant creamware plates were made in England circa 1820. They have a lovely basketweave border and an arcaded edge.

    Dimensions: 8.25″ diameter x 1″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair 18th Century Pierced Creamware Baskets With Stands England Circa 1780

    $3,600.00

    This elegant pair of pierced creamware baskets have beautifully curved strands of openwork creamware. The creamware is molded to imitate the texture of 18th-century English reeded grass or wood baskets. The baskets have twisted rope handles with leaf and flower terminals (see close-up #7). The overall effect is lovely!

    Dimensions of baskets: 10″ x 7.25″ x 2.75″ tall

    Dimensions of stands: 11″ x 9.25″

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Wedgwood Creamware Coffee Pot England Circa 1780

    $1,160.00

    This 18th-century Wedgwood creamware coffee pot has shell edge decoration on the body, handle, and cover, which is surmounted by a stunning finial in the form of a beautiful blossoming rose. The shell edge was one of the first decorative designs that Josiah Wedgwood used in his pottery creations.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ tall x 6″ from end of spout to handle x 4.75″ diameter at the widest point.

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair 18th Century Creamware Platters with Shell Edge England Circa 1785

    $580.00

    This pair of 18th-century creamware oval-shaped platters have lovely shell edge and leaf-form decoration. The two designs are beautifully combined so that they seem to flow into and complement each other. The overall effect is very pretty.

    Dimensions: 11″ x 8″ x .75″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Wedgwood Creamware Coffee Pot England Circa 1780

    $760.00

    This 18th Century Wedgwood creamware coffee pot has a delicate rose finial and lovely impressed fluting around the body, below the spout, and on the cover. Undecorated creamware is all about form. The dimensions of this two-cup coffee pot are visually appealing. The fluting adds visual interest to the gently curving silhouette. Made in England circa 1780, the simplicity and elegance of the form are neoclassical.

    Dimensions: 6.75″ tall x 5.25″ deep x 4″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent with light staining, especially on the handle due to impurities in the clay when made.

    The underside is marked “WEDGWOOD” and has the label of the prominent English antique ceramics dealer John Howard.

  • 18th Century Creamware Pitcher James & Charles Whitehead Yorkshire England C-1780

    $1,260.00

    This elegant water pitcher has neoclassical decoration consisting of two bands of impressed fluting and a lovely intertwined rope handle with leaf and flower terminals. The pitcher is baluster shaped on a domed foot, the body and foot partially fluted, the wavy rim with simple ribbed molding outside and molded with scrollwork and foliage inside opposite the high spreading lip; the ribbed double intertwined loop handle with flower and leaf terminals. The pitcher was made in Staffordshire, England, circa 1780, by James and Charles Whitehead, Hanley.

    For an image and description, see Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, p.127, by Peter Walton, where Walton states, “Corresponds exactly to no.115 in WPB (The Whitehead Catalog 1798) Fluted without cover(s). Note especially the piece of moulded scrollwork inside the rim and the terminal type, both of which agree precisely with the WPB design.”

    The underside has a sticker for Maria and Peter Warren Antiques.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ tall x 6.75″ deep x 4.25″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent

  • Antique English Creamware Basket and Stand Neoclassical England Circa 1770

    $1,130.00

    An outstanding 18th-century pierced creamware chestnut basket and stand made in Staffordshire, England, circa 1770. It is decorated with exquisite neoclassical design. For an image and description, see Creamware and other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, p136-137 Ill. 539, by Peter Walton, where he states “Pale cream with a greenish glaze… with straight sides moulded with quatrefoil pattern within hexagonal panels and each with a pair of foliate handles, the rims of the stands and the lids moulded with quatrefoil pattern within loops, and in addition the lids are pierced and provided with handles in the form of a feeling child with a basket of flowers.”

    Condition: some excellent invisible restoration to the body

  • Pair of 18th Century English Creamware Dishes With Silver Form Edge

    $480.00

    This pair of 18th-century English creamware dishes were made in the style of silver dishes of the period. This elegant neoclassical style is known as the “silver edge.” The borders are gently lobed, have lovely raised edges, and are divided into six panels.

    Dimensions: 7.5″ diameter x 1″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Creamware Pepper Shaker England Circa 1780

    $280.00

    This 18th Century creamware pepper shaker was made in either Yorkshire or Staffordshire, England circa 1780.

    It has a simple, elegant form and a lovely creamy color.

    Dimensions: 5″ tall x 2″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Very good with light craquelure to the pierced top.

  • 18th Century Wedgwood Creamware Cup and Saucer England Circa 1780

    $285.00

    This is an exquisite 18th-century Wedgwood creamware cup and saucer. Made in England circa 1780, the cup has a beautiful rope twist handle with leaf form terminals and elegant impressed vertical fluting that adds visual interest. The underside of the cup and saucer are marked with “WEDGWOOD” impressed.

    Dimensions: 3″ tall x 5″ diameter for the saucer x 2.6″ diameter for the cup

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Leeds Creamware Tureen Made Circa 1780

    $2,600.00

    Leeds Pottery made this exquisite creamware soup tureen in Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. The simple rolled edge on the cover and the foot of the tureen is known as the silver edge. The shape of the tureen is taken from silver tureens of the period. It is perfectly proportioned and beautifully decorated with elegant intertwined rope handles. On the cover, we find a crisply molded rope twist finial, applied decoration in the form of acanthus leaves, wheat sheaves, and a single flower. The overall effect is beautiful!

    Dimensions:  12″ x 8″ x 8″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Late 18th Century Creamware Egg Drainer Made Yorkshire Circles Circa 1790

    $320.00

    Made in Yorkshire circa 1790, this creamware egg drainer has lovely symmetrical piercings, including four heart shapes. For a small useful item, it is exceptionally beautiful. Pierced with an openwork pattern, the drainer has a short handle molded with scrollwork and a small round piercing for hanging on a wall. For a similar example, see Creamware and Other English Pottery At Temple Newsam House, Leeds, p.114.

    Dimensions: 3.25″ diameter x 3.75″ from the end of the handle to the front of the drainer

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Creamware Dish Made England Circa 1785

    $330.00

    This is a beautiful creamware dish with a feather edge design, pierced diamonds and dots, and tiny pearls along the inner edge of the border. The cavetto is fluted. The overall effect is lovely. The dish is described in Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, by Peter Walton, on page 144, Ill 573, where he describes this dish as “Circular, with moulded borders, the walls of the central recess fluted, the rim pierced with a band of openwork pattern.” Made in “Staffordshire or Yorkshire 1780s-1790s”.

    Dimensions: 8″ diameter x .5″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of Creamware Baskets and Stands Made England Circa 1830

    $1,700.00

    This pair of creamware baskets was made by St Anthony’s Pottery at Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, England’s northernmost county. The baskets and stands have beautiful fluting and lovely pierced openwork around their borders. The baskets have delicate branch form handles. The overall effect is exquisite! The baskets and stands are marked “Sewell and Donkin.”*

    Dimensions: The baskets are 11″ long x 8.25″ wide x 3” tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Wedgwood Creamware Charger Made England circa 1820

    $380.00

    This beautiful Wedgwood creamware charger was made circa 1820. It has lovely impressed basketweave decoration that radiates from a central medallion. The border has eye-catching arcades.

    Dimensions:11″ diameter x 1.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Pierced Creamware Bowl and Stand Made England Circa 1820

    $1,280.00

    This is an outstanding early 19th-century pierced creamware bowl and stand made at St Anthony’s Pottery in Northumberland, England, circa 1820. The bowl’s sidewall and the stand’s border have lovely matching piercings in the form of dots and diamonds. The overall effect is exquisite!

    The bowl and stand are marked “SEWELL.” The “SEWELL” mark was in use from 1804-1828.

    Dimensions: Height 6″ x diameter of both the bowl and the stand 9.25″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Wedgwood Creamware Baskets Early 19th Century England Circa 1820

    $1,530.00

    Made in Stoke on Trent, England, circa 1820, this pair of Wedgwood creamware baskets and stands has beautiful proportions decorated with neoclassical designs. The baskets and stands have matching arcades. The baskets rise from a spreading base. Above that are bands of impressed decoration. We see loops that imitate the texture of 18th-century English reeded grass or wood baskets. The baskets are further decorated with a lovely band of “pearls.” The stands are decorated with impressed basketweave decoration that radiates from a center medallion out to the arcade.

    The underside of each basket with impressed “WEDGWOOD” mark and a paper label for the antique pottery dealer Earl Vandekar.

    Dimensions: basket 10″ long x 6″ wide x 5″ to top of handle   stand 10.25″ long x 8.5″ wide

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Small Pierced Creamware Dish England Circa 1785

    $285.00

    This 18th-century creamware plate was made in Staffordshire, England, circa 1785. It is a little gem with beautiful piercings on the border and angled fluting in the cavetto. The hand piercings are in the shape of diamonds, stars, and hearts. The fluting in the cavetto adds visual interest as light plays across the fluting.

    Dimensions: 6″ in diameter x .5″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with minimal defects due to impurities in the clay when the plate was fired.

  • 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dish England Circa 1780

    $560.00

    The border of this 18th-century creamware dish has exquisite piercings in the form of diamonds, dots, and hearts. The piercings were done by hand. Along the rim beyond the piercings is a band of impressed tiny “pearls.” The overall effect is lovely!

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter x .75″ height

    Condition: Excellent with a small spot on the edge where the glaze didn’t take when the piece was fired (see images).

  • Wedgwood 18th Century Pierced Creamware with Painted Decoration England C-1785

    $580.00

    This Wedgwood pierced creamware dish was made at the Wedgwood factory in Stoke-on-Trent, England, circa 1785. The elegant piercings are hand-made. The cavetto is decorated with a band of eye-catching red up-down squiggles. The edge of the plate is decorated with a thin band of brown slip. The overall effect is exquisite! This plate is one of my favorites.

    On the underside is the impressed mark “WEDGWOOD.”

    Dimensions: 9″ in diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Wedgwood Pierced Creamware Dishes England Early 19th Century Circa 1810

    $760.00

    Wedgwood decorated this pair of pierced creamware dishes with a lovely band of hand-painted pansies around the border. The brightly colored flowers add a charming touch to the dishes. The beautiful piercings have practical use; they were made to allow water to drain from the dishes when they were filled with cooked vegetables. At the top edge, a thin black line accentuates the diamond-shaped form.

    Dimensions: 11.25″ x 9.25″ x 2.5″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century English Creamware Charger

    $860.00

    This beautiful 18th-century English creamware charger copies the elegant style of English chargers made of silver. The style consists of a lobed edge  and a rolled, grooved border that divides the border into six panels. The style is known as the “Silver  Edge.”

    The Neoclassical style was all the rage in England in the second half of the 18th century prized the silver form’s simple lines.
    This charger is part of our extensive collection of antique creamware.

  • Two 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dishes Oval Shaped Made England Circa 1785

    $770.00

    Both of these creamware dishes have beautiful piercings in the form of hearts, dots, and diamonds. Made in eighteenth-century England circa 1785, they have lovely impressed neoclassical decoration on the border. The main image shows that the lower dish has a “Silver Edge” and the upper dish has a “Feather Edge.” The upper dish also has a pair of female portraits, and both dishes have vine-form decoration.

    Dimensions: the upper dish measures 10.5″ x 9″ x .75″ in height, and the lower dish measures  11″ x 9.75″ x .75″ in height

    Condition: Excellent with some original light mineral staining on the edge of both dishes

  • Set of Four Wedgwood Arcaded Pearlware Oval Dishes England Circa 1840

    $480.00

    This set of four Wedgwood pearlware dishes has a lovely impressed basketweave design, an elegant arcaded edge, with thin lines of blue and green outlining the arcaded edge. The center is delineated by red markings and a thin blue line that echoes the oval shape of each dish.

    Dimensions: 10″ long x 8.5″ wide x 1.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dish Oval Shaped England Circa 1780

    $320.00

    Made in Staffordshire or Yorkshire, England, circa 1785, this beautiful 18th-century creamware dish is decorated with neoclassical decoration. The border has handmade piercings in the form of dots, diamonds, and stars. The border is also decorated with impressed delicate foliate swags that drop into the cavetto and is further decorated with a lovely “Feather Edge.”

    Dimensions: 9″ x 7.5″ x 1.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Arcaded Creamware Dishes England Circa 1820

    $480.00

    This pair of outstanding arcaded creamware dishes are decorated in the cavetto with lovely sepia-colored grapevines with small grapes and large grape leaves. The border is decorated with an attractive impressed basketweave design, and the edge is arcaded. Thin bands of sepia outline the arcades and encircle the border, accentuating both.

    Dimensions: 7.5″ in diameter x .75″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • A Leeds Pottery Creamware Centerpiece Made England Circa 1785

    $3,600.00

    This fabulous 18th-century English creamware sculpture was made by the Leeds Pottery, Yorkshire, circa 1785. It consists of the two top pieces of the Leeds Platt Menage. The Platt Menage is perhaps the ultimate creamware creation. Four female figures in the form of winged mermaids hold up a covered bowl on their shoulders. The bowl is decorated with neoclassical decorations: portraits and scrolling vines. The cover is decorated with acanthus leaves and an egg and dart border along the edge. A beautiful figure of Venus surmounts the cover. The overall effect is magnificent!

    The Platt Menage is now mounted on a block of cherry wood secured by museum putty (so it is removable).

    Dimensions: 11.5″ tall x 5.5″ diameter at the widest point x 2.75″ across the base

    Condition: Very good, with some excellent invisible restoration to several small chips on the mermaids’ wings.

    According to Peter Walton, the attribution of this Platt Menage to Leeds Pottery is traditional (see pg. 121 in Creamware and other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds. Mr. Walton continues to describe the Platt Menagein plate 462. It is described as havingPale cream with a yellow glaze.” Walton quotes Jewitt 1878, I, p.477, fig 854, “They (Platt Menages) were greatly admired by the early collectors. It is well to show collectors to what degree of perfection in design these almost forgotten works had achieved.”

  • Pair 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dishes England Circa 1780

    $820.00

    This pair of lovely creamware dishes have wide borders with exquisite handworked piercings. Many of the piercings are in the form of a heart. The cavetto is beautifully fluted. The fluting adds life to the dish as light plays over the curves of each flute.

    Dimensions: 9.25″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent.

  • 18th Century Leeds Pottery Creamware Tureen Yorkshire, England Circa 1780

    $3,600.00

    Leeds Pottery made this perfectly proportioned large 18th-century creamware tureen in Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. It is embellished with elegant rope handles that end in sprigged* wheat sheaf terminals. The beautiful cover is decorated with an elegant rope knop and delicate sprigged flowers and leaves. Three bands of crisply molded Feather Edge design encircle the body’s base and midline and the cover’s outer edge. The quality of the material and workmanship is equal to the work of the best porcelain factories of the period.

    For an image and description, see Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds p.94, by Peter Walton where Walton states that the tureen has “Pale cream with a greenish-yellow glaze. Oval, four-lobed with bowed sides, spreading foot, moulded feather borders and a pair of double-terminals, the domed lid with a cord loop handle with straggling terminals of flowers, stems and leaves.”

    Dimensions: 14″ across the handles x 10.25″ wide x 10.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent with one small chip on the inside flange professionally restored

  • Pierced Creamware Bowl with Cover 18th Century England Circa 1780

    $1,260.00

    Made in Staffordshire or Yorkshire, England, circa 1780, this pierced, covered creamware bowl was made for serving fruits, nuts, or sweets. The cover has intricate, expertly crafted handmade piercings in the form of hearts, dots, and diamonds (see images). The delicate, all-around, pierced decoration is outstanding. A fabulous rose finial tops the cover. The bowl has impressed ribbing around the base and impressed fluting around the lower half.
    For an image and description, see Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, by Peter Walton pgs.107-108, where Walton states, “Pale cream with a pale green glaze…on a high spreading foot the lower part of the body fluted, the upper part plain with a turned ribbed border at the rim, the domed lid with panels of pierced openwork…and with large flower-knob with leaf and bud terminal.”

    Dimensions: 6″ diameter x 6.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent. The cover’s inside has mineral staining due to impurities in the clay when fired. There is no staining on the outside.

  • Pierced Creamware Covered Bowl 18th Century England Circa 1780

    $1,160.00

    This lovely pierced, covered creamware bowl was made in Staffordshire or Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. It was made to serve fruits, nuts, or sweets. The bowl and its cover have intricate, expertly crafted handmade piercings. The delicate, all-around, pierced decoration is outstanding. Extensive open piercings like this are rare on 18th-century English creamware. An elegant acorn finial adds height to the bowl.

    The underside of the bowl has a label for prominent English antique pottery dealer John Howard.

    Dimensions: 5.75″ diameter x 7″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Creamware Heart Shaped Dish England Late 18th Century Made by Wedgwood and Co

    $240.00

    The first popular use of the heart shape as a symbol of love is often attributed to the importance of courtly romance in late-medieval life. At a time when chivalrous knights and damsels in distress made for romantic tales, tokens of love were deeply significant and very popular.
    This creamware heart-shaped dish was made in late 18th century England, circa 1790 by Wedgwood & Co.*
    The decoration is elegant: a floral swag of green, blue, and orange echoes the heart shape of the dish. The border is decorated with cobalt blue dots, accentuating the dish’s outline. At the center is a single small flower.
    With its warm creamware body and elegant decoration, this would also be a perfect “Hello” dish when placed near the front door of the home. It would also prove useful for holding keys and other small things.
    The underside of the dish is marked WEDGWOOD & Co.

    Dimensions: 10.5″ across x 7.5″ from point to top x 1.5″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with very small original firing defects in the creamware material, which can be seen when the images are enlarged.

  • Pair of Creamware Dishes Showing a Songbird England Circa 1870

    $385.00

    This pair of beautiful creamware dishes was made in the mid-19th century by British Tamborine, a small pottery factory in Staffordshire, England.
    The very pretty design features a songbird on a branch with a brightly colored butterfly above.
    Around the songbird are roses and other flowers painted in soft pinks, purples, and orange.
    The border is covered with mulberry colored swags of similarly painted flowers.
    The edge of each dish is gently lobed, creating another pretty touch.
    These dishes would be perfect in a country home.

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter x .6″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Set of Five Wedgwood Creamware Dinner and salad Dishes Made England circa 1820

    $770.00

    This set of Wedgwood five dinner and salad dishes was made in England in the early 19th century, circa 1820. The dishes are decorated with the 18th-century Wedgwood “Wheat” pattern on light mint green and peach color borders. The creamware body has a warm look. The combination of the soft creamware with the colorful border and the elegant “Wheat” pattern is beautiful. The result is stylish and sophisticated. The undersides of the dishes are marked “WEDGWOOD.”

    Dimensions: The salad dishes measure 8″ in diameter, and the dinner dishes measure 10″ in diameter.

    Condition: Excellent

  • Set Dozen Wedgwood Creamware Dinner Dishes Made England 1904

    $1,400.00

    Made in 1904, the border design on this set of Wedgwood dinner dishes was inspired by designs in Josiah Wedgwood’s mid-18th century First Pattern Book. The red berries and beige leaves on the vine combine perfectly with the creamy color of the creamware plate. The result is a subtle beauty. The underside of the dishes has an impressed mark for Wedgwood and “W G” for August 1904.

    Dimensions: diameter 9.25″ x .75″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of French Mid-19th Century Flower Decorated Creamware Dishes

    $320.00

    This pair of French creamware dishes shows sprigs of beautiful flowers. The images are crisp. We see two shades of purple, green, and yellow. The color combination is perfect. Made by the Creil-Montereau factory in the mid-19th century, circa 1860, the pattern was inspired by the hand-painted flowers on 18th-century French and English porcelain. The dishes are made of pearled creamware, pottery perfected by an Englishman, Josiah Wedgwood, in the 1780s. Under the artistic and technical direction of native English potters, Creil-Montereau introduced France to transfer printing on creamware and raised it to a high state of perfection during its peak years in the 19th century. The pottery factory of Creil (Oise) was founded in 1797. In 1840 the Creil factory merged with the Montereau factory (Seine et Marne). The company became “Creil et Montereau Faïenceries” under the name Lebeuf, Milliet & Co. (LM & Co.), and continued until 1876.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter x 1.5″ deep.

    Condition: Excellent with the very, very slightest rubbing to the colors.

  • Pair Antique Dishes Elephants Image Shows One of Two

    $300.00

    We are pleased to offer this pair of antique English dishes showing an elephant in an Asian setting (see image # 3 to see both dishes in the pair side by side). Made circa 1800, these octagonal pearl glazed creamware dishes feature a lively scene with two figures riding an Indian elephant through an exotic landscape. The combination of several “Asian” style motifs was a common theme in 19th century England. Along a winding road, we see large fruit trees and fenced gardens. The road leads into the distance, where we see a tall pagoda temple.
    The pattern is printed in brown with overglaze enameling in orange, yellow, green, and blue.
    The dishes are unmarked but are similar to the later Wedgwood & Co. “Processional Elephant and Howdah” pattern made in the mid-19th century. Minnie Holdaway suggests that these dishes were the inspiration for the later Wedgwood & Co. pattern since they date to the early 19th century.
    Dimensions: 9 inches diameter x 1 inch height
    Condition: Excellent                 Price: $300 for the pair of dishes
    References: Holdaway, Minnie. The Wares of Ralph Wedgwood. English Ceramic Circle Transactions Vol. 12 Part 3. London: The Lincoln’s Inn Press Ltd, 1986.

  • Pair Creamware Dishes 18th Century England Painted in Pink & Purple Made c-1770

    $420.00

    We are pleased to offer this lovely pair of 18th century English creamware dishes made circa 1780. Decorated in enamels, both plates
    feature a chinoiserie scene. In conversation, we see two fashionably dressed women, a small child holding a pinwheel as he looks up, pointing to a group of chimes, and an older boy standing nearby. And at the far right, we see another boy seated with a parrot on his arm.
    Dimensions: 9.5 inches diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $420 for the pair
    History of creamware
    Creamware was created in the 1760s by Josiah Wedgwood. He was the first of the English potters to produce a cream-colored earthenware with a light-colored body. Wedgwood marketed these wares as Queensware after Queen Charlotte gave Wedgwood the honor of ordering a set. As its popularity increased, many of the other English potters began to make creamware as well. It replaced saltglaze stoneware as the dinnerware of all but the high aristocracy, which most likely would have had a service of Chinese export porcelain dishes.

  • Large Pierced Creamware Charger by Leeds Pottery 18th Century England c-1785

    $2,300.00

    This magnificent creamware charger was made at the Leeds Pottery in Yorkshire, England, circa 1785.
    Hand-pressed from a mold, it has exquisite piercings and a beaded edge.
    Dimensions: 14.75″ in diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $2,300
    The underside is marked LEEDS POTTERY (impressed).
    For an image of this pattern on a Leeds Pottery plate, see image 571 on pg 144 in Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds by Peter Walton, where he notes “Yorkshire 1780s-1790s” for this creamware design.
    Please note that the last image in the series, which is hard to read, is the underside of the charger.

  • Mochaware Pitcher Mocha Ware Milk Chocolate Color Made England Circa 1815

    $1,360.00

    This mochaware pitcher is decorated with bands of lovely milk chocolate-colored slip.
    This color works beautifully with the unpainted creamware body of the handle and interior of the pitcher.
    Just below the top edge, we see a band of black and white rouletting, and above the bottom edge is a similar black and white rouletted band.
    Dimensions: 5.75″ tall x 4″ at the widest point
    Condition: Good: two short hairlines of approximately half an inch are seen on either side of the top edge. There is a hairline on the underside which does not go through.
    Price: $1360
    Background of Mochaware: Mochaware pottery is slip-decorated, lathe-turned, earthenware with bands of colored slip applied to buff-colored or white bodies

  • Wedgwood Creamware Platter or Charger 18th Century Made in England Circa 1785

    $265.00

    This Wedgwood creamware round platter or charger was made in 18th century England circa 1785. The border is decorated with a traditional neoclassical design of iron-red flower heads connected by midnight brown “diamonds”.

    Diameter: 12″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Odd Fellows Creamware Pitcher Very Large England Circa 1850

    $1,640.00

    This very large creamware pitcher is fully decorated with the imagery and symbols of the Odd Fellows (see images).
    Odd Fellows promote philanthropy, the ethic of reciprocity, and charity.
    At the front of the pitcher, we see a panel with the words “We are odd Fellows When we act and Do the  thing which is Right.”
    Around this panel are the words “How grand in Age How fair in Youth is Holly Friendship, Love and Truth.”
    Above the panel is an open palm with a heart symbolic of charity given from the heart.
    On both sides of the pitcher is the Odd Fellows motto, “Amicitia Amor et Veritas,”; which translates to Friendship, Love, and Truth.
    The motto is seen together with an image of Lady Justice and an angel holding a budding branch. Lady Justice personifies morality in judicial systems. The budding branch symbolizes the idea that truth can “draw freshness and verdure” from the “most barren facts and common things in life” and give them life and interest.
    Above all of this is a shining sun. As the sun shines on us all, it symbolizes impartiality in the benevolence of the Odd Fellows.

    Dimensions: 9.75″ tall x 8.25″ diameter
    Condition: An invisible restoration to the underside of the vase, only, and some scratching, particularly to the lustered leaves and the flowers and the lustered top edge.

  • Pair of Large Wedgwood Bowls Made in England, circa 1820

    $360.00

    A pair of large Wedgwood bowls their borders painted with a lovely, delicate vine with lavender and lavender-pink flowers and green leaves. They are simple, understated, and beautiful. The underside of each bowl is marked with an impressed “WEDGWOOD” and “DD” and “No 1106″ written in underglaze blue (1106 is the Wedgwood pattern #).

    Dimensions: The bowls measure 10.25″ diameter x 2” deep.

    Condition: Excellent with very slight crazing from the initial firing.

  • Pair of 18th Century Swansea Creamware Botanical Dishes

    $1,500.00

    From the Private Collection of Mario Buatta
    This pair of 18th-century botanical dishes is part of the private collection of Mario Buatta. This is an especially lovely pair of dishes. Mario loved the beautiful flowers painted on English botanical dishes. He was our very best client for four decades. Just after the very successful Sotheby’s sale Bardith was privileged to purchase items from his estate.
    This pair of 18th-century hand-painted creamware dishes was made by Swansea in Wales circa 1790. Dishes showing a single botanical flower were especially popular in late 18th century Great Britain as the scientific revolution began and British ships traveled the world often returning with new and unique specimens of flowers.
    The Swansea factory in Wales provided some of the very finest botanicals painted on dishes.
    The designs for these dishes were taken from Curtis’s Botanical Magazine begun in 1787.
    On the back of the dish is the name of the flower inscribed in iron red.
    Each dish is named on the back in underglaze red:
    The pair of dishes measure 7.75″ diameter.
    On the reverse, they are named: “Two Leave’d Lady’s Sliper” and “Virgin’s Bower”
    London…”

    Condition: Excellent

    For an image of similar Swansea Botanical dishes See: Jonathan Gray “The Cambrian Company, Swansea Pottery in London…”

  • Apt Mixed Earths Centerpiece Made in France Mid-19th Century circa 1840

    $2,600.00
  • Twelve Creamware Dinner Dishes Yellow Borders Made circa 1800

    $1,900.00
  • English Creamware Racing Horse by Leeds Pottery Made Circa 1840

    $9,600.00

    A very rare late Leeds Pottery stallion modeled standing on an oblong base. Creamware enamel-painted horses are rare. The largest horses were made by Leeds. Our horse is 16.75 inches tall x 14.75″ long. It’s quite impressive. The original Leeds Pottery factory closed between 1849 and 1850. This cream colored horse has an orange bridle and a full bushy tail. He stands with his head to the right wearing a halter, the lead line lying across his back. The figure is finely modeled; the tail is neatly applied swinging onto one hind leg. The top of the base is a mottled green within a molded stiff leaf border which is glazed in manganese.

    Dimensions: H 16.75 in. x W 7 in. x D 14.75 in.

    Condition: Excellent with some craquelure in the glaze

  • English Pottery Shell Shaped Dish with Yellow Ground

    $600.00
  • Pair of 18th Century Creamware Lions

    $3,200.00
  • Dozen Antique Wedgwood Creamware Dinner Plates

    $1,800.00

    We are pleased to offer this set of a dozen Wedgwood creamware dinner plates with a thistle design. These English creamware dinner plates date to the late 19th century. They have a lovely, simple design decorated with flowering thistle boughs in the Japonisme style. Japonisme involved Western arts with a Japanese aesthetic focused on asymmetrical compositions and elements of color and line.
    Made circa 1880, the back of each dish is stamped “Wedgwood.”

    Dimensions: The plates measure a generous 9.85 inches in diameter.

    Condition: Excellent

  • English Creamware 18th Century Sweetmeat Platt Menage

    $7,600.00
  • Pair of Antique Creamware Wall Pockets

    $1,700.00
  • Antique 18th Century Creamware Covered Box

    $480.00

    We are pleased to offer this sweet 18th-century English creamware covered box decorated with well-painted sprigs of flowers on the cover and along the sides of the circular box (see images). A sprig of spring flowers was one of the traditional decorations for 18th-century creamware. Inside the box, there are two compartments (see image #2).

    Dimensions: diameter: 6 inches, height 2.5 inches

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of 18th C. Creamware English Flower Holders

    $4,300.00

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