Jugs, Pitchers, & Mugs

Showing all 8 results

  • 18th Century Wedgwood Creamware Coffee Pot England Circa 1780

    $760.00

    This 18th Century Wedgwood creamware coffee pot has a delicate rose finial and lovely impressed fluting around the body, below the spout, and on the cover. Undecorated creamware is all about form. The dimensions of this two-cup coffee pot are visually appealing. The fluting adds visual interest to the gently curving silhouette. Made in England circa 1780, the simplicity and elegance of the form are neoclassical.

    Dimensions: 6.75″ tall x 5.25″ deep x 4″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent with light staining, especially on the handle due to impurities in the clay when made.

    The underside is marked “WEDGWOOD” and has the label of the prominent English antique ceramics dealer John Howard.

  • Early Derby Porcelain Coffee Can att. to George Robertson, circa 1795

    $3,200.00

    A green-ground porcelain coffee can made by the Derby Porcelain Factory circa 1795. This green-ground coffee can is a fine example of early Derby porcelain. The shipwreck scene, titled on the bottom “A Shipwreck after a Storm” in hand-written script, is attributed to the painter George Robertson. The gilding, executed by Joseph Stables, remains in pristine condition.

    Condition: Excellent. Small rim chip measuring 0.4 cm with associated in-painting of gilt.

    Dimensions: 2 1/2 in. H x 2 7/8 in. Dm (6.4 cm H x 6.9 cm Dm)

    Provenance:
    Private English collection
    Mellors & Kirk, Nottingham, 4/30/2009, lot 106
    Thence by family descent

  • Early 19th Century Creil French Mochaware Coffee Pot

    $1,900.00

    A Creil mochaware peach-colored coffee pot made circa 1810.

    This elegant coffee pot features a dark brown mocha design on a light peach body. Mochaware was developed in Staffordshire in the late 18th century, but spread to continental Europe through the Middle-Eastern moss agate trade. Moss agate stones, which sport a similar tree-like design, were exported to the West through the port of al Makha, translated in English to “Mocha.” While moss agates were used as semiprecious stones in jewelry and objets de vertu for the upper classes, their dendrite design inspired potters such as Creil to create mochawares for more quotidian usage.

    Dimensions: 10 in. H x 6 1/4 at widest point (25.4 cm H x 15.9 cm W)

    Condition: Excellent visual condition, with invisible professional restoration to cover and spout. Some minor staining to clay body under the glaze on the foot.

  • Odd Fellows Creamware Pitcher Very Large England Circa 1850

    $1,640.00

    This very large creamware pitcher is fully decorated with the imagery and symbols of the Odd Fellows (see images).
    Odd Fellows promote philanthropy, the ethic of reciprocity, and charity.
    At the front of the pitcher, we see a panel with the words “We are odd Fellows When we act and Do the  thing which is Right.”
    Around this panel are the words “How grand in Age How fair in Youth is Holly Friendship, Love and Truth.”
    Above the panel is an open palm with a heart symbolic of charity given from the heart.
    On both sides of the pitcher is the Odd Fellows motto, “Amicitia Amor et Veritas,”; which translates to Friendship, Love, and Truth.
    The motto is seen together with an image of Lady Justice and an angel holding a budding branch. Lady Justice personifies morality in judicial systems. The budding branch symbolizes the idea that truth can “draw freshness and verdure” from the “most barren facts and common things in life” and give them life and interest.
    Above all of this is a shining sun. As the sun shines on us all, it symbolizes impartiality in the benevolence of the Odd Fellows.

    Dimensions: 9.75″ tall x 8.25″ diameter
    Condition: An invisible restoration to the underside of the vase, only, and some scratching, particularly to the lustered leaves and the flowers and the lustered top edge.

  • Large Majolica Owl Pitcher Art Nouveau Style Made in England, Late 19th Century

    $760.00

    A marvelous Majolica owl made in the Art Nouveau style in England circa 1890. The figure is painted in bright enamels with stunning pink breast feathers, turquoise eyes, and deep brown feathers on the sides and back. The owl stands on a twisting green branch which forms the handle of the pitcher. A single pink and yellow flower forms the thumb rest at the top handle.

    Dimensions: 11″ tall x 4.75″ across x 6″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Antique English Soft Paste Porcelain Liverpool Coffee Pot 18th Century

    $600.00

    We are pleased to offer this rare Liverpool soft-paste porcelain coffee pot made in England in the late 18th century, circa 1785.                                                             The pot is painted with a lovely chinoiserie scene on both sides of the body. In the scene, a lady stands in front of a blossoming plum tree.                                    She offers a basket of sweets to two boys. The artisan skillfully integrated chinoiserie figures into the design to add exotic appeal in an era when China was still a distant land of mystery.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Dimensions: 10.5″ tall x 8.5″ deep x 5″ wide
    Condition: Very good with a single fine short hairline (see images).

  • Mochaware Pitcher Decorated with “”Trees” and Seaweed” England, circa 1810

    $1,400.00

    Made in England circa 1810 this mochaware pitcher is decorated with “Trees” and “Seaweed.” It is molded in an elegant shape with an extra-wide mouth probably made this way so that pieces of fruit in a punch could pour out. The pitcher has bands of orange-brown slip decorated with both “Trees” and “Seaweed”. These dendritic designs are part of what make mochaware is unique. The design is formed by using small amounts of an acidic dark brown liquid and carefully dropping this liquid onto the alkaline orange slip before firing. The resultant chemical reaction causes the tree-seaweed pattern. Because the patterns are caused by chemical reactions each one is unique. The managers of mochaware factories often only specified the style of the work but gave each turner some freedom regarding the choice of design and colors. On this pitcher, the slip bands are separated by six thin bands of impressed white pearls and two white bands of impressed waves.

    Dimensions: 6.75 inches tall x 7 inches deep x 4.5 inches diameter at widest point

    Condition: Excellent with very slight fritting and toning along the top edge.

  • Mochaware Mug Twig and Wavy line Decoration England c-1830 Rickard Collection

    $470.00

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