Neoclassical

Showing all 21 results

  • Obelisk Hercules Wrestling Lion Pearled Creamware Pearlware England, Circa 1800

    $1,400.00

    This obelisk was made in England, circa 1800, at the height of the neoclassical period. The obelisk’s base is painted in a beautiful turquoise, centering a medallion showing Hercules wrestling the Lion of Nemea. This was the first of Hercules’ twelve labors. Narrow sculptural bands of acanthus leaves frame the turquoise. Acanthus is a symbol of immortality. Hercules’s success in seemingly impossible labors won him an immortal place amongst the gods. Hints of the original gilding around the medallion still show. The obelisk’s shaft is decorated with acanthus leaves.

    Dimensions: 11.75″ tall x 3.75″ deep x 3.75″ wide

    Condition: Excellent with slight edge frits invisibly restored

  • Pair 18th Century Pierced Creamware Baskets With Stands England Circa 1780

    $3,600.00

    This elegant pair of pierced creamware baskets have beautifully curved strands of openwork creamware. The creamware is molded to imitate the texture of 18th-century English reeded grass or wood baskets. The baskets have twisted rope handles with leaf and flower terminals (see close-up #7). The overall effect is lovely!

    Dimensions of baskets: 10″ x 7.25″ x 2.75″ tall

    Dimensions of stands: 11″ x 9.25″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Antique English Creamware Basket and Stand Neoclassical England Circa 1770

    $1,130.00

    An outstanding 18th-century pierced creamware chestnut basket and stand made in Staffordshire, England, circa 1770. It is decorated with exquisite neoclassical design. For an image and description, see Creamware and other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, p136-137 Ill. 539, by Peter Walton, where he states “Pale cream with a greenish glaze… with straight sides moulded with quatrefoil pattern within hexagonal panels and each with a pair of foliate handles, the rims of the stands and the lids moulded with quatrefoil pattern within loops, and in addition the lids are pierced and provided with handles in the form of a feeling child with a basket of flowers.”

    Condition: some excellent invisible restoration to the body

  • Pair of 18th Century English Creamware Dishes With Silver Form Edge

    $480.00

    This pair of 18th-century English creamware dishes were made in the style of silver dishes of the period. This elegant neoclassical style is known as the “silver edge.” The borders are gently lobed, have lovely raised edges, and are divided into six panels.

    Dimensions: 7.5″ diameter x 1″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century Creamware Pepper Shaker England Circa 1780

    $280.00

    This 18th Century creamware pepper shaker was made in either Yorkshire or Staffordshire, England circa 1780.

    It has a simple, elegant form and a lovely creamy color.

    Dimensions: 5″ tall x 2″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Very good with light craquelure to the pierced top.

  • 18th Century Leeds Creamware Tureen Made Circa 1780

    $2,600.00

    Leeds Pottery made this exquisite creamware soup tureen in Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. The simple rolled edge on the cover and the foot of the tureen is known as the silver edge. The shape of the tureen is taken from silver tureens of the period. It is perfectly proportioned and beautifully decorated with elegant intertwined rope handles. On the cover, we find a crisply molded rope twist finial, applied decoration in the form of acanthus leaves, wheat sheaves, and a single flower. The overall effect is beautiful!

    Dimensions:  12″ x 8″ x 8″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of Creamware Baskets and Stands Made England Circa 1830

    $1,700.00

    This pair of creamware baskets was made by St Anthony’s Pottery at Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, England’s northernmost county. The baskets and stands have beautiful fluting and lovely pierced openwork around their borders. The baskets have delicate branch form handles. The overall effect is exquisite! The baskets and stands are marked “Sewell and Donkin.”*

    Dimensions: The baskets are 11″ long x 8.25″ wide x 3” tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Pierced Creamware Bowl and Stand Made England Circa 1820

    $1,280.00

    This is an outstanding early 19th-century pierced creamware bowl and stand made at St Anthony’s Pottery in Northumberland, England, circa 1820. The bowl’s sidewall and the stand’s border have lovely matching piercings in the form of dots and diamonds. The overall effect is exquisite!

    The bowl and stand are marked “SEWELL.” The “SEWELL” mark was in use from 1804-1828.

    Dimensions: Height 6″ x diameter of both the bowl and the stand 9.25″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Wedgwood Creamware Baskets Early 19th Century England Circa 1820

    $1,530.00

    Made in Stoke on Trent, England, circa 1820, this pair of Wedgwood creamware baskets and stands has beautiful proportions decorated with neoclassical designs. The baskets and stands have matching arcades. The baskets rise from a spreading base. Above that are bands of impressed decoration. We see loops that imitate the texture of 18th-century English reeded grass or wood baskets. The baskets are further decorated with a lovely band of “pearls.” The stands are decorated with impressed basketweave decoration that radiates from a center medallion out to the arcade.

    The underside of each basket with impressed “WEDGWOOD” mark and a paper label for the antique pottery dealer Earl Vandekar.

    Dimensions: basket 10″ long x 6″ wide x 5″ to top of handle   stand 10.25″ long x 8.5″ wide

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Wedgwood Pierced Creamware Dishes England Early 19th Century Circa 1810

    $760.00

    Wedgwood decorated this pair of pierced creamware dishes with a lovely band of hand-painted pansies around the border. The brightly colored flowers add a charming touch to the dishes. The beautiful piercings have practical use; they were made to allow water to drain from the dishes when they were filled with cooked vegetables. At the top edge, a thin black line accentuates the diamond-shaped form.

    Dimensions: 11.25″ x 9.25″ x 2.5″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Two 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dishes Oval Shaped Made England Circa 1785

    $770.00

    Both of these creamware dishes have beautiful piercings in the form of hearts, dots, and diamonds. Made in eighteenth-century England circa 1785, they have lovely impressed neoclassical decoration on the border. The main image shows that the lower dish has a “Silver Edge” and the upper dish has a “Feather Edge.” The upper dish also has a pair of female portraits, and both dishes have vine-form decoration.

    Dimensions: the upper dish measures 10.5″ x 9″ x .75″ in height, and the lower dish measures  11″ x 9.75″ x .75″ in height

    Condition: Excellent with some original light mineral staining on the edge of both dishes

  • Set of Four Wedgwood Arcaded Pearlware Oval Dishes England Circa 1840

    $480.00

    This set of four Wedgwood pearlware dishes has a lovely impressed basketweave design, an elegant arcaded edge, with thin lines of blue and green outlining the arcaded edge. The center is delineated by red markings and a thin blue line that echoes the oval shape of each dish.

    Dimensions: 10″ long x 8.5″ wide x 1.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Arcaded Creamware Dishes England Circa 1820

    $480.00

    This pair of outstanding arcaded creamware dishes are decorated in the cavetto with lovely sepia-colored grapevines with small grapes and large grape leaves. The border is decorated with an attractive impressed basketweave design, and the edge is arcaded. Thin bands of sepia outline the arcades and encircle the border, accentuating both.

    Dimensions: 7.5″ in diameter x .75″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • A Leeds Pottery Creamware Centerpiece Made England Circa 1785

    $3,600.00

    This fabulous 18th-century English creamware sculpture was made by the Leeds Pottery, Yorkshire, circa 1785. It consists of the two top pieces of the Leeds Platt Menage. The Platt Menage is perhaps the ultimate creamware creation. Four female figures in the form of winged mermaids hold up a covered bowl on their shoulders. The bowl is decorated with neoclassical decorations: portraits and scrolling vines. The cover is decorated with acanthus leaves and an egg and dart border along the edge. A beautiful figure of Venus surmounts the cover. The overall effect is magnificent!

    The Platt Menage is now mounted on a block of cherry wood secured by museum putty (so it is removable).

    Dimensions: 11.5″ tall x 5.5″ diameter at the widest point x 2.75″ across the base

    Condition: Very good, with some excellent invisible restoration to several small chips on the mermaids’ wings.

    According to Peter Walton, the attribution of this Platt Menage to Leeds Pottery is traditional (see pg. 121 in Creamware and other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds. Mr. Walton continues to describe the Platt Menagein plate 462. It is described as havingPale cream with a yellow glaze.” Walton quotes Jewitt 1878, I, p.477, fig 854, “They (Platt Menages) were greatly admired by the early collectors. It is well to show collectors to what degree of perfection in design these almost forgotten works had achieved.”

  • Pair 18th Century Pierced Creamware Dishes England Circa 1780

    $820.00

    This pair of lovely creamware dishes have wide borders with exquisite handworked piercings. Many of the piercings are in the form of a heart. The cavetto is beautifully fluted. The fluting adds life to the dish as light plays over the curves of each flute.

    Dimensions: 9.25″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent.

  • 18th Century Leeds Pottery Creamware Tureen Yorkshire, England Circa 1780

    $3,600.00

    Leeds Pottery made this perfectly proportioned large 18th-century creamware tureen in Yorkshire, England, circa 1780. It is embellished with elegant rope handles that end in sprigged* wheat sheaf terminals. The beautiful cover is decorated with an elegant rope knop and delicate sprigged flowers and leaves. Three bands of crisply molded Feather Edge design encircle the body’s base and midline and the cover’s outer edge. The quality of the material and workmanship is equal to the work of the best porcelain factories of the period.

    For an image and description, see Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House, Leeds p.94, by Peter Walton where Walton states that the tureen has “Pale cream with a greenish-yellow glaze. Oval, four-lobed with bowed sides, spreading foot, moulded feather borders and a pair of double-terminals, the domed lid with a cord loop handle with straggling terminals of flowers, stems and leaves.”

    Dimensions: 14″ across the handles x 10.25″ wide x 10.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent with one small chip on the inside flange professionally restored

  • Set Six Antique Porcelain Armorial Soup Plates English Porcelain Burgundy Borders

    $380.00

    Copeland made this set of six excellent armorial soup dishes in England circa 1870.The dishes feature deep burgundy-colored borders and a boar’s head armorial with crest, escutcheon, and motto.There are golden tassels where the border meets the white porcelain and dots and stars of gold decorating the border.                 The dishes measure a generous 10″ in diameter.                  Condition: Excellent.          Price: $380                                                                                                                                                 The armorial is that of Sir Thomas Gabriel, 1st Baronet.  Born in 1811, he served as Sheriff of London and Middlesex from 1859–to 60 and Lord Mayor of London from 1866 to 67. Soon after his term as Lord Mayor* he was created a baronet. The Motto: In Prosperis Time In Adversis Spera (Fear In Prosperity, Hope In Adversity) Crest: On a mount Vert a boar’s head erased Sable billety Or. Escutcheon: Sable on a pile Or ten billets four three two and one of the field.*The Lord Mayor is not the Mayor of London. The Lord Mayor’s primary role has been to represent, support, and promote the businesses of the City of London.Background of Copeland Porcelain:In the early 1820s, the Spode factory, managed by Josiah Spode II and his business partner William Copeland, became the largest pottery in Stoke, England. In 1833 William Taylor Copeland, William Copeland’s son acquired the business in partnership with Thomas Garrett. The factory’s productions from this period were marked ‘Copeland and Garrett.’ Typical wares produced during the Copeland and Garrett period were in the rococo style, which was fashionable then. In 1846, William Taylor Copeland acquired the company outright, and he and four generations of his descendants controlled the company until 1966. William Taylor Copeland was a classic Victorian industrialist, combining ownership of the factory with a career in politics and public life – as a member of Parliament. Under the Copelands, the factory vied with Minton in making some of the most spectacular ceramics wares of the age. Gifted artists, such as C. F. Hurten, were imported from continental factories, and superb pieces were exhibited at the Great Exhibition of London in 1851, International Exhibitions in London in 1862, and Paris in 1878.

  • Large Red Greekware Platter with Well and Tree Made by Herculaneum, circa 1820

    $760.00

    Herculaneum made this fabulous well and tree platter in England circa 1820. It is decorated in the “Greek” pattern with neoclassical figures and mythological scenes based on ancient Greek and Roman art. The lovely deep red color brings the white images into focus. At the center is a historic scene from Olympic history. We see Cynisca, a Spartan princess and athlete, racing a chariot at the Greek Olympic Games in 392 BC. She became the first woman to win at the Olympics.* Printed on earthenware, Herculaneum’s “Greek” pattern is transferware. The central image was taken from a 1791 collection of engravings from ancient Greek vases discovered in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies purchased by Sir William Hamilton, a British envoy to the court of Naples.

    Dimensions: 20 long x 16″ wide x 2.75″ tall.

    Condition: a hairline restored and some crackle in the glaze, both visible on the back of the platter.

  • Large Blue and White Greek Platter England circa 1810 Neoclassical Decoration

    $2,200.00

    Spode made this fabulous platter circa 1810. It is decorated in the neoclassical “Greek” pattern with classical figures and mythological scenes based on ancient Greek and Roman art. It is large, measuring 20″ x 15.5″ x 1.75″ deep, and is perfect for hanging. The pattern shows a scene from Olympic history. At the center, we see Cynisca winning the four-horse chariot race at the Greek Olympic Games in 392 BC. She became the first woman to win at the Olympics.* The rectangular platter is printed in blue with leaf and berry ground, radiating medallions, and urns containing classical scenes. This was the first multi-scene pattern introduced at the Spode factory. The central image was taken from a 1791 collection of engravings from ancient vases of Greek workmanship discovered in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies purchased by Sir William Hamilton, a British envoy to Naples court. The platter is marked on the underside with the Spode mark in underglaze blue (see image #11).

    Dimensions: 20″ x 15.5″ 1.75″ deep

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Pair Wedgwood Black Basalt Urn Neoclassical Made in England Circa 1840

    $6,500.00

    In the late 18th-century, Josiah Wedgwood and his partner Bentley designed the model for this pair of mid-9th century black basalt urns. This Wedgwood pair was made circa 1840.

    The exquisite designs were inspired by original antiquities from vases in the collections amassed by 18th-century English collectors. The urns are decorated with neoclassical scenes of figures in oval medallions. The urns are decorated with garlands of laurel and four medallions depicting: Night, Day, The Dipping of Achilles, and Hope and Plenty. They are further embellished with floral festoons and rams head handles.

    Dimensions: diameter: 7.5″ x 3.75″ across the base x 14″  tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • From the Collection of Mario Buatta a Neoclassical Saucer Dish England c-1810

    $360.00

    Provenance: The Private Collection of Mario Buatta
    Made in England circa 1820, this elegant and beautiful saucer dish has fluting which seems to form ripples in the porcelain.
    It is decorated with a single gold flower in the center surrounded by red flowers with gold stems and leaves.
    The border has red feathers and gold links.
    As were most of Mario’s choices it is simply beautiful.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

Showing all 21 results