English Pottery

Showing all 52 results

  • Dozen Spode Dinner Dishes England Circa 1850 Made by Copeland and Garret

    $960.00

    This set of a dozen antique earthenware dishes has beautiful borders filled with flowers painted in dusty purple and light blue, some with pale yellow centers and purple leaves. Close to the edge of the dish, we see a pattern of purple darts. The combination of colors is lovely. The dishes are marked “Late Spode.” They were made circa 1850 by Copeland and Garrett, who purchased Spode’s business in 1833.

    Dimensions: diameter 9.8″ x depth 1″

    Condition: Excellent with very tiny original firing defects

  • Set of Five Wedgwood Creamware Dinner and salad Dishes Made England circa 1820

    $770.00

    This set of Wedgwood five dinner and salad dishes was made in England in the early 19th century, circa 1820. The dishes are decorated with the 18th-century Wedgwood “Wheat” pattern on light mint green and peach color borders. The creamware body has a warm look. The combination of the soft creamware with the colorful border and the elegant “Wheat” pattern is beautiful. The result is stylish and sophisticated. The undersides of the dishes are marked “WEDGWOOD.”

    Dimensions: The salad dishes measure 8″ in diameter, and the dinner dishes measure 10″ in diameter.

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Red Greekware Platter with Well and Tree Made by Herculaneum, circa 1820

    $760.00

    Herculaneum made this fabulous well and tree platter in England circa 1820. It is decorated in the “Greek” pattern with neoclassical figures and mythological scenes based on ancient Greek and Roman art. The lovely deep red color brings the white images into focus. At the center is a historic scene from Olympic history. We see Cynisca, a Spartan princess and athlete, racing a chariot at the Greek Olympic Games in 392 BC. She became the first woman to win at the Olympics.* Printed on earthenware, Herculaneum’s “Greek” pattern is transferware. The central image was taken from a 1791 collection of engravings from ancient Greek vases discovered in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies purchased by Sir William Hamilton, a British envoy to the court of Naples.

    Dimensions: 20 long x 16″ wide x 2.75″ tall.

    Condition: a hairline restored and some crackle in the glaze, both visible on the back of the platter.

  • English Soup Tureen Made, circa 1820

    $430.00

    Made by Hicks and Meigh circa 1820, this lovely tureen is perfect for flowers. The lively decoration is full of color. We see a butterfly hovering above a flower-filled garden. Pink fruit tree blossoms and purple peonies rise above cobalt blue rockwork. Green leaves and small ochre-colored flowers complete the scene. The tureen has no cover.

    Dimensions:13.5″ long x 9″ wide x 6.5″ tall, the inside depth is 5″

    Condition: Excellent with slight rubbing to the gilt on handles only (see image # 6).

  • Blue and White Pearled Creamware Sugar Box or Sucrier Made England Circa 1820

    $330.00

    This lovely blue and white pearlware pottery sugar box is decorated with three beautiful patterns of leaves and berries. The body, the top edge around the cover, and the cover each have a similar but slightly different pattern. The edge of the sugar box has a precise machine-turned ridge which adds an exciting detail to the form. Made in England in the early 19th century, circa 1820, the cobalt blue decoration was applied by hand using a stencil. Because the colors were applied by hand, each design is slightly different, especially in the intensity of the blue.

    Dimensions: 5″ tall x 4.65″ in diameter

    Condition: Excellent

    We have a similar sugar box available.

  • Set Dozen Wedgwood Creamware Dinner Dishes Made England 1904

    $1,620.00

    Made in 1904, the border design on this set of Wedgwood dinner dishes was inspired by designs in Josiah Wedgwood’s mid-18th century First Pattern Book. The red berries and beige leaves on the vine combine perfectly with the creamy color of the creamware plate. The result is a subtle beauty. The underside of the dishes has an impressed mark for Wedgwood and “W G” for August 1904.

    Dimensions: diameter 9.25″ x .75″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Blue and White Greek Platter England circa 1810 Neoclassical Decoration

    $2,600.00

    Spode made this fabulous platter circa 1810. It is decorated in the neoclassical “Greek” pattern with classical figures and mythological scenes based on ancient Greek and Roman art. It is large, measuring 20″ x 15.5″ x 1.75″ deep, and is perfect for hanging. The pattern shows a scene from Olympic history. At the center, we see Cynisca winning the four-horse chariot race at the Greek Olympic Games in 392 BC. She became the first woman to win at the Olympics.* The rectangular platter is printed in blue with leaf and berry ground, radiating medallions, and urns containing classical scenes. This was the first multi-scene pattern introduced at the Spode factory. The central image was taken from a 1791 collection of engravings from ancient vases of Greek workmanship discovered in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies purchased by Sir William Hamilton, a British envoy to Naples court. The platter is marked on the underside with the Spode mark in underglaze blue (see image #11).

    Dimensions: 20″ x 15.5″ 1.75″ deep

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Pair Antique Spode Oval Shaped Dishes Decorated with Waterlilies England C-1825

    $740.00

    The most exceptional aspect of this pair of dishes is the fabulous gilding lavished over the cobalt borders. As a less prominent feature, the gilding carries throughout the decoration. The bright gold combined with the unexpected use of purple with turquoise and green makes this a stunning pair of dishes. The gilt and exquisite colors jump from the clean white ground of the pearled creamware.

    Dimensions: 11″ long x 7.75″ wide x 2.25″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Set Hicks and Meigh Ironstone Dinner and Soup Dishes Made England circa 1820

    $720.00

    Made by Hicks and Meigh, this set has six dinner dishes and five matching soup dishes. The decoration is lovely: a butterfly hovers above a flower-filled garden. We see purple peonies and pink fruit tree blossoms emanating from cobalt blue rockwork.

    Dimensions: Both the soups and the dinner dishes measure 10.25″ in diameter

    Condition: Good with some knife marks and rubbing to the glaze

  • Pair Antique Dishes Elephants Image Shows One of Two

    $530.00

    We are pleased to offer this pair of antique English dishes showing an elephant in an Asian setting (see image # 3 to see both dishes in the pair side by side). Made circa 1800, these octagonal pearl glazed creamware dishes feature a lively scene with two figures riding an Indian elephant through an exotic landscape. The combination of several “Asian” style motifs was a common theme in 19th century England. Along a winding road, we see large fruit trees and fenced gardens. The road leads into the distance, where we see a tall pagoda temple.
    The pattern is printed in brown with overglaze enameling in orange, yellow, green, and blue.
    The dishes are unmarked but are similar to the later Wedgwood & Co. “Processional Elephant and Howdah” pattern made in the mid-19th century. Minnie Holdaway suggests that these dishes were the inspiration for the later Wedgwood & Co. pattern since they date to the early 19th century.
    Dimensions: 9 inches diameter x 1 inch height
    Condition: Excellent                 Price: $530 for the pair of dishes
    References: Holdaway, Minnie. The Wares of Ralph Wedgwood. English Ceramic Circle Transactions Vol. 12 Part 3. London: The Lincoln’s Inn Press Ltd, 1986.

  • Dozen Ashworth Dinner Plates Makers of Mason’s Ironstone England Circa 1880

    $5,200.00

    In 1861 Mason’s Ironstone was bought by Ashworth Brothers Ltd., who continued to produce “Mason’s Ironstone.”
    This set of stunning dinner plates (10.25″ in diameter) has borders decorated with exquisite white lilies on clean black ground.
    Painted in enamels, the white flowers jump off the black ground.
    The details of the decoration, the red lines on the flowers, the green and yellow leaves, and the gilding all add to the beauty of each dish.

    Dimensions:10.25″ in diameter
    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Ironstone Bowl Made England Circa 1870

    $480.00

    This lovely bowl is decorated with a beautiful garden scene showing a blossoming fruit tree rising from blue rockwork, oversized white and pink peonies, ochre-colored chrysanthemums, and a butterfly hovering above.
    This beautiful central scene is encircled by a blue border with scrolling vines and flower heads.
    Flowers on the vine decorate the sides of the bowl, and the edge is decorated with “diamonds” and flowers.
    The design is timeless with enduring appeal.

    Dimensions: 14.5″ long x 11.25″ wide x 2.75″ deep

    Condition: Very good: with very slight rubbing to the enamels and slight knife marks that are not ordinarily visible without very close inspection (see images)

  • Blue and White Pearled Creamware Sugar Box

    $285.00

    This lovely pearlware sugar box has the timeless appeal of soothing blue and white. Made in England in the early 19th century with blue decoration applied by hand. Each design is slightly different, especially in the intensity of the blue.

    Dimensions: 4.75″ tall x 5.25″ wide

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Square Drabware Dishes Made England, Circa 1830

    $480.00

    This pair of drabware dishes has a rich earth tone color. The John Ridgway factory made these dishes in England circa 1830. Pressed out in a mold, these eye-catching drabware dishes have raised neoclassical decoration around a central roundel. Drabware is unlike other pottery. The rich color of all drabware stems from the fact that each piece is created using dark clay rather than white clay. Transparent glaze over the dark clay produces drabware’s naturally rich, saturated color.

    Dimensions: 8″ x 8″ x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Small Drabware Vase Neoclassical Design Made England, Circa 1830

    $760.00

    Ridgway made this drabware vase in England circa 1830. Pressed out in a mold, this eye-catching vase has high-relief neoclassical decoration consisting of Roman-style portraits under a band of grape leaves on the vine. The handles are in the form of intertwined branches. This elegant design is finished with an egg and dart decoration around the top edge. Drabware is unlike other pottery. The rich color of all drabware stems from the fact that each piece is created using dark clay rather than white clay. Transparent glaze over the clay produces drabware’s naturally rich, saturated color.

    Dimensions: 7″ across the handles x 4.75″ diameter x 5.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Creamware Dishes 18th Century England Painted in Pink & Purple Made c-1770

    $720.00

    We are pleased to offer this lovely pair of 18th century English creamware dishes made circa 1780. Decorated in enamels, both plates
    feature a chinoiserie scene. In conversation, we see two fashionably dressed women, a small child holding a pinwheel as he looks up, pointing to a group of chimes, and an older boy standing nearby. And at the far right, we see another boy seated with a parrot on his arm.
    Dimensions: 9.5 inches diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $720 for the pair
    History of creamware
    Creamware was created in the 1760s by Josiah Wedgwood. He was the first of the English potters to produce a cream-colored earthenware with a light-colored body. Wedgwood marketed these wares as Queensware after Queen Charlotte gave Wedgwood the honor of ordering a set. As its popularity increased, many of the other English potters began to make creamware as well. It replaced saltglaze stoneware as the dinnerware of all but the high aristocracy, which most likely would have had a service of Chinese export porcelain dishes.

  • Set of Four Wedgwood Dessert Dishes Showing a Pair of Ducks Made England c-1820

    $380.00

    We are pleased to offer this set of four Wedgwood dessert dishes showing a simply beautiful scene with a pair of ducks by the water’s edge. Nearby are a flowering fruit tree and rockwork painted in Imari colors of iron red, cobalt blue, and glistening gold. The artist has left much of the surface unpainted, allowing the crisp, clean white of the pottery to show.
    The dishes were made by Wedgwood in England, circa 1820.

    Dimensions: diameter 8″                      Condition: Excellent                  Price: $380 for the four dishes

  • Pair Spode Shell-Shaped Dishes Orange and Blue Early 19th Century, Circa 1820

    $580.00

    Spode made this pair of fine quality shell-shaped dishes in England in the early 19th century, circa 1820. The dishes were printed in shades of orange and blue Orange and blue is the traditional color combination of Imari porcelains first exported from Japan to Europe in the mid 17th century. Here the use of these two colors is simply elegant. The design shows a traditional garden scene with blue rockwork, orange peonies and chrysanthemums, and bamboo. decorated with both orange and blue leaves.

    Dimensions: 10 long x 8.5″ wide x 2″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Salt Glazed Charger 18th Century Made in England circa 1765

    $860.00

    Provenance: The Collection of Sir Samuel Hoare*
    This large and exquisite salt-glazed charger was made in Staffordshire, England, in the 18th century circa 1765. The design is elegant and straightforward: the only decoration is the lobed and gadrooned edge. Press-molded, salt-glazed chargers, plates, dishes, and other service pieces filled the cupboards and dining rooms of middle and upper-class English and American homes from the mid-1740s until the end of the 18th century. The advent of this white stoneware dinnerware instigated a tabletop revolution.

    Diameter: 15″

    *A paper label on the back of the charger (see image #6)
    **J Skerry “Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America.”
    ***For an image of this type of charger recovered archaeologically at Colonial Williamsburg, see J Skerry “Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America.” page 231.

  • Large Pierced Creamware Charger by Leeds Pottery 18th Century England c-1785

    $2,300.00

    This magnificent creamware charger was made at the Leeds Pottery in Yorkshire, England, circa 1785.
    Hand-pressed from a mold, it has exquisite piercings and a beaded edge.
    Dimensions: 14.75″ in diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $2,300
    The underside is marked LEEDS POTTERY (impressed).
    For an image of this pattern on a Leeds Pottery plate, see image 571 on pg 144 in Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds by Peter Walton, where he notes “Yorkshire 1780s-1790s” for this creamware design.
    Please note that the last image in the series, which is hard to read, is the underside of the charger.

  • Mochaware Pitcher Mocha Ware Milk Chocolate Color Made England Circa 1815

    $1,360.00

    This mochaware pitcher is decorated with bands of lovely milk chocolate-colored slip.
    This color works beautifully with the unpainted creamware body of the handle and interior of the pitcher.
    Just below the top edge, we see a band of black and white rouletting, and above the bottom edge is a similar black and white rouletted band.
    Dimensions: 5.75″ tall x 4″ at the widest point
    Condition: Good: two short hairlines of approximately half an inch are seen on either side of the top edge. There is a hairline on the underside which does not go through.
    Price: $1360
    Background of Mochaware: Mochaware pottery is slip-decorated, lathe-turned, earthenware with bands of colored slip applied to buff-colored or white bodies

  • Pair of Early 19th Century Wedgwood Rosso Antico Jardinieres

    $4,000.00

    A pair of rosso antico jardinières made by Wedgwood, ca. 1810. This pair of jardinieres has a beautiful basketweave pattern accentuated by black basalt details in the Egyptian Revival style.

    Dimensions: 5 1/2 in. Dm x 6 3/4 in. H (13.9 cm Dm x 17.8 cm H)

    Condition: Excellent. Segment of lack rope-twist band on back of one jardinière missing, measuring 0.7 cm.

    References: Wedgwood Museum, 1319.

  • Early 19th Century Orange English Mochaware Waste Bowl

    $1,900.00

    An English mochaware waste bowl in the London shape with cable or “earthworm” decoration, dating to circa 1820.

    Developed in Staffordshire in the late 18th century, dipped wares utilized colored liquid clay slips to create surprisingly modern abstract and geometric motifs. This small waste bowl features a cable design with marbled colors of dark brown, blue, and white slip on an orange ground. The bowl’s rim has a rouletted band of chevrons lightly glazed in green. The bright color palette of this bowl dates it to an earlier period of production, circa 1820. Later dipped wares have much more subdued colors.

    Condition: The bowl is in very good condition, with two tiny chips to the rim each measuring approximately 0.2 cm in length. The underside of the base has some glaze flaking. There is a hairline circular crack in the well of the bowl.

    Dimensions: 4 5/8 in. diameter x 2 1/2 in. height (11.8 cm diameter x 6.6 cm height).

  • Wedgwood Creamware Platter or Charger 18th Century Made in England Circa 1785

    $365.00

    This Wedgwood creamware round platter or charger was made in 18th century England circa 1785. The border is decorated with a traditional neoclassical design of iron-red flower heads connected by midnight brown “diamonds”.

    Diameter: 12″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Odd Fellows Creamware Pitcher Very Large England Circa 1850

    $1,640.00

    This very large creamware pitcher is fully decorated with the imagery and symbols of the Odd Fellows (see images).
    Odd Fellows promote philanthropy, the ethic of reciprocity, and charity.
    At the front of the pitcher, we see a panel with the words “We are odd Fellows When we act and Do the  thing which is Right.”
    Around this panel are the words “How grand in Age How fair in Youth is Holly Friendship, Love and Truth.”
    Above the panel is an open palm with a heart symbolic of charity given from the heart.
    On both sides of the pitcher is the Odd Fellows motto, “Amicitia Amor et Veritas,”; which translates to Friendship, Love, and Truth.
    The motto is seen together with an image of Lady Justice and an angel holding a budding branch. Lady Justice personifies morality in judicial systems. The budding branch symbolizes the idea that truth can “draw freshness and verdure” from the “most barren facts and common things in life” and give them life and interest.
    Above all of this is a shining sun. As the sun shines on us all, it symbolizes impartiality in the benevolence of the Odd Fellows.

    Dimensions: 9.75″ tall x 8.25″ diameter
    Condition: An invisible restoration to the underside of the vase, only, and some scratching, particularly to the lustered leaves and the flowers and the lustered top edge.

  • Large Majolica Owl Pitcher Art Nouveau Style Made in England, Late 19th Century

    $870.00

    A marvelous Majolica owl made in the Art Nouveau style in England circa 1890. The figure is painted in bright enamels with stunning pink breast feathers, turquoise eyes, and deep brown feathers on the sides and back. The owl stands on a twisting green branch which forms the handle of the pitcher. A single pink and yellow flower forms the thumb rest at the top handle.

    Dimensions: 11″ tall x 4.75″ across x 6″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Tortoiseshell Ware Called Whieldon Ware England Mid-18th Century Circa 1765

    $1,680.00

    This pair of antique creamware dishes each have exquisite tortoiseshell decoration. Though these dishes were made in mid-18th century England, circa 1765, they look strikingly modern. The decoration was made on a buff or cream-colored plate by sponging or dusting dry, powdered, metallic oxides onto the plate after its initial firing. The seemingly contemporary, abstract look was created using colored oxide stains, which ran freely when heated in the kiln. As a result, each piece of tortoiseshell creamware is unique.
    Creamware with this type of decoration is also known as Whieldon ware. It was developed by the English master potter Thomas Whieldon.

    Dimensions: diameter 9.25″ and 9.5.”

    Condition: Excellent

  • Set 11 Large Masons Ironstone Dinner Plates Circa 1915

    $4,300.00

    The color is fabulous.

    This excellent set of eleven Mason’s Ironstone plates is decorated in rich rust color with overall black detailing resembling sharkskin. This attractive set dates to circa 1915.  On the reverse is a transfer printed crown and banner in black with the pattern number ‘C.1753’ in iron-red, and the impressed “2XG” and “ENGLAND,” which Masons began to stamp after 1891. The marks indicate Masons made the set circa 1915.

    Dimensions: 10.5″ diameter.                      Price: $4,300

    Condition: Good with crazing to the reverse of the dishes (see images #10 and #11). Crazing results from the initial firing process in 1915 when the glaze and the earthenware body under it expanded and contracted at different rates during the heating and cooling process.

  • Mochaware Mug with Mocha “Trees” & Inscribed “E-R” under a Crown and “19__” .

    $430.00

    This style of mochaware mug was among the most popular throughout the 19th century. The mug is decorated with blue and beige bands of slip and further decorated with an all-around design of mocha “trees” On the front of the mug just above the base is a small inscription “E-R” perhaps standing for Edward Regis, the new King of England. The underside of the mug has a plastic label, which seems to be a museum catalog number.

    Dimensions: 3.5″ diameter x 5″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

    Price: $430

  • Pair of Large Wedgwood Bowls Made in England, circa 1820

    $360.00

    A pair of large Wedgwood bowls their borders painted with a lovely, delicate vine with lavender and lavender-pink flowers and green leaves. They are simple, understated, and beautiful. The underside of each bowl is marked with an impressed “WEDGWOOD” and “DD” and “No 1106″ written in underglaze blue (1106 is the Wedgwood pattern #).

    Dimensions: The bowls measure 10.25″ diameter x 2” deep.

    Condition: Excellent with very slight crazing from the initial firing.

  • Hand Painted Prattware Plaque Showing a Pair of Lions, Made England, circa 1800

    $780.00

    Provenance: The Rouse Lench Collection
    A pair of lions resting comfortably on a Prattware plaque. They probably just finished a big meal! Hand painted in three brown shades: their bodies are painted light brown, their manes, and tails a darker brown, and their muzzles an almost black, midnight brown. The brushwork is intentionally prominent. The effect is splendid! As is the case with the lions on this plaque, Prattware has raised decoration colored with underglaze oxides.

    Dimensions: 11″ x 9″ x 2″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Small Antique Mochaware Cup, Made in England, circa 1825

    $440.00

    An exquisite small Mochaware cup with a green glazed impressed border along the top edge. The main body is decorated with brown slip which is further decorated with engine-turned vertical, and horizontal stripes cut through the slip. Made in England circa 1825, this is a rare shape for a piece of Mochaware as it is neither a pitcher, a mug, or a bowl.

    Dimensions: 2″ tall x 2.5″ diameter at widest point

    Condition: Excellent; from the original manufacturing process several small flecks of the green and brown decoration can be seen on the handle.

  • Pair of Spode Ironstone Plates Lavender & Pink Borders Made England, circa 1820

    $350.00

    A pair of Spode plates, 9.5″ diameter, made in England, circa 1820. The centers are decorated with flowers and rockwork in a chinoiserie design. The exquisite border is decorated with a patterned lavender and iron-red design and further decorated with blue and green branch-like decorations around cartouches filled with pink roses.

    Dimensions: 9.5″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Mochaware Pitcher Decorated with “”Trees” and Seaweed” England, circa 1810

    $1,600.00

    Made in England circa 1810 this mochaware pitcher is decorated with “Trees” and “Seaweed.” It is molded in an elegant shape with an extra-wide mouth probably made this way so that pieces of fruit in a punch could pour out. The pitcher has bands of orange-brown slip decorated with both “Trees” and “Seaweed”. These dendritic designs are part of what make mochaware is unique. The design is formed by using small amounts of an acidic dark brown liquid and carefully dropping this liquid onto the alkaline orange slip before firing. The resultant chemical reaction causes the tree-seaweed pattern. Because the patterns are caused by chemical reactions each one is unique. The managers of mochaware factories often only specified the style of the work but gave each turner some freedom regarding the choice of design and colors. On this pitcher, the slip bands are separated by six thin bands of impressed white pearls and two white bands of impressed waves.

    Dimensions: 6.75 inches tall x 7 inches deep x 4.5 inches diameter at widest point

    Condition: Excellent with very slight fritting and toning along the top edge.

  • Mochaware Pitcher Made in England, circa 1820

    $2,300.00

    This mochaware pitcher was made of pearl glazed creamware in England circa 1820. It has a unique design with freeform decoration in orange, light blue, and white on two wide black slip bands. The managers of mochaware factories often only specified the style of the work but gave each turner some freedom regarding the choice of design and colors. With rare exceptions, each piece of mochaware is unique. To make this design, the lathe operator would have removed the pitcher from the lathe and poured the colored slip onto the pitcher. Thin lines of bright orange slip encircling the pitcher energize the freeform design. Crisp leaf terminals on the handle add to the beauty of the piece.

    Dimensions: 7″ tall x 5.25″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Blue and White Dogs on a Staffordshire Saucer

    $385.00

    From the Collection of Mario Buatta
    Mario loved dogs! In many of the homes he decorated he hung paintings of hounds and spaniels throughout the rooms. Here we have a small but exquisite dish showing a pair of hounds at rest. The wide border is filled with flowers and leaves in a traditional Staffordshire style of the Regency period. The lively deep cobalt blue adds to the beauty of the dish.

    Made circa 1820 the dish is marked with the factory mark of Ralph and James Clews. The Clews factory was located in Stoke-on Trent in Staffordshire.

    Dimensions: Dm 6 in.

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Pair of 18th Century Swansea Creamware Botanical Dishes

    $1,500.00

    From the Private Collection of Mario Buatta
    This pair of 18th-century botanical dishes is part of the private collection of Mario Buatta. This is an especially lovely pair of dishes. Mario loved the beautiful flowers painted on English botanical dishes. He was our very best client for four decades. Just after the very successful Sotheby’s sale Bardith was privileged to purchase items from his estate.
    This pair of 18th-century hand-painted creamware dishes was made by Swansea in Wales circa 1790. Dishes showing a single botanical flower were especially popular in late 18th century Great Britain as the scientific revolution began and British ships traveled the world often returning with new and unique specimens of flowers.
    The Swansea factory in Wales provided some of the very finest botanicals painted on dishes.
    The designs for these dishes were taken from Curtis’s Botanical Magazine begun in 1787.
    On the back of the dish is the name of the flower inscribed in iron red.
    Each dish is named on the back in underglaze red:
    The pair of dishes measure 7.75″ diameter.
    On the reverse, they are named: “Two Leave’d Lady’s Sliper” and “Virgin’s Bower”
    London…”

    Condition: Excellent

    For an image of similar Swansea Botanical dishes See: Jonathan Gray “The Cambrian Company, Swansea Pottery in London…”

  • Small Blue and White Tea Cup and Saucer

    $235.00

    From the Collection of Mario Buatta
    A blue and white English pottery teacup and saucer made in the Regency period circa 1825. We see a delicate overall printed pattern showing small trees. This cup was made for a tea purist. It is just large enough for a few sips of hot tea. If it were bigger, by the time one got to the last sips, the tea would have cooled a bit.

    Mario was our very best client for four decades. Blue and white was one of his passions. He loved intense blue.

    Dimensions: diameter of saucer 4.5″, diameter of cup 2.75″ x height 2.35″

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Antique Pottery Horse Made in England at St. Anthony’s Pottery, circa 1800-1810

    $5,200.00
  • Mochaware Mug Twig and Wavy line Decoration England c-1830 Rickard Collection

    $700.00
  • Pair Wedgwood Egyptian Revival Black Basalt Sphinxes Made 18th Century Circa 1785

    $8,600.00
  • English Creamware Racing Horse by Leeds Pottery

    $9,600.00
  • Wedgwood Egyptian Revival Black Basalt and Rosso Antico Incense Burner

    $900.00
  • English Pottery Shell Shaped Dish with Yellow Ground

    $600.00
  • 18th Century Pratt Pearlware Dish

    $250.00
  • Extra Large Orange Punch Bowl Made England Circa 1860

    $1,400.00

    A large bowl painted in a soft orange with a simple black neoclassical design on the inner border, and a black painted edge. The shape of the bowl is deep with steep rounded sides rising from a short foot to a flared rim. The combination of the monochrome orange with the painted black details makes an eye catching bowl. This bowl would be lovely in a modern or traditional home.

  • Set Antique Wedgwood Creamware Dinner Plates

    $2,800.00

    We are pleased to offer this set of 30 Wedgwood creamware dinner plates with a thistle design. These English creamware dinner plates date to the late 19th century. They have a lovely, simple design decorated with flowering thistle boughs in the Japonisme style. Japonisme involved Western arts with a Japanese aesthetic focused on asymmetrical compositions and elements of color and line.
    Made circa 1880, the back of each dish is stamped “Wedgwood.”

    Dimensions: The plates measure a generous 9.85 inches in diameter.

    Condition: Excellent

    Price: $1,500 per dozen – These dishes can be purchased as a group or by the dozen. Please contact us for more information.

  • Prattware Watch Stand with Original Pottery Watch

    $900.00
  • English Creamware 18th Century Sweetmeat Platt Menage

    $9,600.00
  • Pair of Antique Creamware Wall Pockets

    $1,700.00
  • Pair of Antique Drabware Candlesticks

    $250.00
  • Pair of 18th C. Creamware English Flower Holders

    $4,300.00

Showing all 52 results