All Products

Showing 1–100 of 246 results

  • Blue and White Delft Plate Made Circa 1800

    $480.00

    This lovely Delft plate is hand-painted in deep cobalt blue. Made in the Netherlands circa 1800, it shows flowers bursting into view. The border is decorated with panels depicting buds and flowers.

    Dimensions: 9.25″ diameter x 1″ height

    Condition: Excellent with small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Set Fourteen Coalport Money Tree Porcelain Dishes Hand-Painted England C-1820

    $5,600.00

    We are proud to offer this set of fourteen Coalport Money Tree pattern plates. This fabulous Coalport pattern is also known as the Rock and Tree pattern. It is one of the very best of the Regency period porcelain patterns. The color combinations are magnificent. Cobalt blue, iron red, and gold are the main colors. Green and orange highlights bring the deep reds and blues to life. The dishes were hand-painted in England, circa 1820. The pattern shows a fenced garden, peonies, and a willow tree with golden branches. English patterns like this were inspired by Japanese Imari designs, which were very popular in Europe during the Regency Period. However, English porcelain is whiter than Japanese porcelain. The result is that the colors seem brighter and livelier when contrasted with the white ground.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Blue and White Greek Platter England circa 1810 Neoclassical Decoration

    $2,600.00

    Spode made this fabulous platter circa 1810. It is decorated in the neoclassical “Greek” pattern with classical figures and mythological scenes based on ancient Greek and Roman art. It is large, measuring 20″ x 15.5″ x 1.75″ deep, and is perfect for hanging. The pattern shows a scene from Olympic history. At the center, we see Cynisca winning the four-horse chariot race at the Greek Olympic Games in 392 BC. She became the first woman to win at the Olympics.* The rectangular platter is printed in blue with leaf and berry ground, radiating medallions, and urns containing classical scenes. This was the first multi-scene pattern introduced at the Spode factory. The central image was taken from a 1791 collection of engravings from ancient vases of Greek workmanship discovered in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies purchased by Sir William Hamilton, a British envoy to Naples court. The platter is marked on the underside with the Spode mark in underglaze blue (see image #11).

    Dimensions: 20″ x 15.5″ 1.75″ deep

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Made Netherlands circa 1770 Chinoiserie Decoration

    $960.00

    This blue and white Dutch Delft charger shows a chinoiserie scene in a lovely naive style. The chinoiserie scene in the center of the charger includes three unique viewpoints. On one side, we see a flower and buds in a vase. On the other side, we see stacks of water with pagodas at the water’s edge. The third image is a pair of mountains sketched below the two scenes. Seeing the three viewpoints at the same time is exciting.

    Dimensions: 13.5″ x 2.25″ height

    Condition: Excellent with slight edge frits invisibly restored

  • Antique Blue and White Delft Charger Hand-Painted in England circa 1765

    $1,200.00

    This lovely Delft charger was hand-painted in England in the mid-18th century, circa 1765. The center shows a naïve garden scene with a willow tree, an oversized flower, and a large blue bud. The border decoration echoes the center scene. It is likely that a senior artist made the outlines and then handed the plate over to someone else to fill in the straight line decoration. Nevertheless, the result is beautiful.

    Dimensions: 13″ in diameter x 2″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Hand Painted Mid-18th Century, Circa 1765

    $1,480.00

    This beautiful blue and white Dutch Delft charger shows a vibrant and detailed garden scene hand-painted in shades of cobalt blue. The decoration is crisp. The artist gave life to the well-painted scene by using a variety of shades of blue. Flowers spring from rockwork and fill the central space while a small butterfly hovers above. A butterfly with flowers is symbolic of love as butterflies love flowers. Along the border are five panels with simple floral decoration. The panels are separated by cross-hatching, known as “diamonds.”

    Dimensions: 14″ in diameter x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent: with small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Pair of French Mid-19th Century Flower Decorated Creamware Dishes

    $470.00

    This pair of French creamware dishes shows sprigs of beautiful flowers. The images are crisp. We see two shades of purple, green, and yellow. The color combination is perfect. Made by the Creil-Montereau factory in the mid-19th century, circa 1860, the pattern was inspired by the hand-painted flowers on 18th-century French and English porcelain. The dishes are made of pearled creamware, pottery perfected by an Englishman, Josiah Wedgwood, in the 1780s. Under the artistic and technical direction of native English potters, Creil-Montereau introduced France to transfer printing on creamware and raised it to a high state of perfection during its peak years in the 19th century. The pottery factory of Creil (Oise) was founded in 1797. In 1840 the Creil factory merged with the Montereau factory (Seine et Marne). The company became “Creil et Montereau Faïenceries” under the name Lebeuf, Milliet & Co. (LM & Co.), and continued until 1876.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter x 1.5″ deep.

    Condition: Excellent with the very, very slightest rubbing to the colors.

  • Large Chinese Imari Porcelain Charger Made Qianlong Era Circa 1760

    $2,860.00

    This large Chinese Imari porcelain charger dates to the Qianlong period of the Qing dynasty, circa 1760. Finely potted with a lovely rich, glassy, white glaze, the charger is hand-painted in a vivid Imari palette of orange-red, cobalt blue, and gold. We see chrysanthemums, lotus, and peony flowers in full bloom. The exquisite orange-red decoration is detailed and outlined in gold, which gives the design a luxurious look. On the underside, we see the artemisia leaf mark painted in underglaze blue within a traditional double ring. Typical of Chinese Imari ware in this period, the charger’s underside also bears a traditional sketch of two branches of plum blossoms.

    Dimensions: 14.15″ in diameter x 1.75″ in height

    Condition: a single edge chip invisibly restored

  • Pair Blue and White Delft Jars Hand-Painted 18th Century Netherlands circa 1780

    $2,860.00

    This pair of 18th-century Delft jars has a lovely distinctive style, taken from nature. The rich cobalt blue designs are hand-painted. We see curving and scrolling floral patterns. The lobed shape of the jars adds life to the decoration as light plays over the curving surface. The tops have flower form skirts (see image #5). The combination is beautiful.

    Dimensions: 14.75″ tall x 7.75″ diameter at widest point x 4.5″ diameter at base

    Condition: Good with some excellent invisible restoration.

  • Blue and White Dutch Delft Charger 18th Century Made, Circa 1770

    $930.00

    This hand-painted Dutch Delft charger features a delightful, topsy turvy chinoiserie scene with a fresh point of view. We see a wall of blue rockwork stretching to a blue sky. Around and seemingly hanging from the rockwork is a flower-filled vine. Below that is a pagoda, then water, and a diminutive pagoda. The wide border is decorated with lovely floral designs.

    Dimensions: 13.75″

    Condition: Excellent with small edge fits invisibly restored

  • Victorian Watercolor Portrait “Scandalous” Lady Painted by M King Signed Dated 1829

    $730.00

    The hand-written notes on the back of this miniature watercolor tell what was at the time a scandalous story.
    The portrait is of Hanah Tichbon. The inscription reads in part, “went to the races…, “ran away from Sheffets…” and later ran away in London.” Portraits in the Victorian period were done to present public identities. On the back of this portrait, we have a hand-written inscription that provides insight into the private life of the sitter. It is an intriguing and seemingly sad story of a young woman’s life which is literally hidden behind her portrait.
    At this time in England, if a married woman was unhappy with her situation, there was, almost without exception, nothing she could do about it. Except in extremely rare cases, a woman could not obtain a divorce and, until 1891, if she ran away from an intolerable marriage, the police could capture and return her. All this was sanctioned by church, law, custom, history, and approved of by Victorian society in general. The story this portrait and inscription tell is a genuine piece of history.
    In the portrait, Hanah wears white with a gold chain and cross around her neck. She holds a book, quite probably a Bible. The image infers that our sitter is a proper young lady.
    In reality, her life story was not anything like it appeared. This pencil and watercolor portrait was done on card. Written on the back of the painted card is: “Hanah Tichbon Alias Hanah Honsett born Sept 22nd 1809 Married Thomas Matcham on the 6 of Oct’br 1829 left him at Bath in Aug’st 1831 for six week… On Aug’st 2nd 1835 went to Brighton races and stayt 6 weeks. Oct’br 22nd 1837 ran away from Sheffets 8 month away July 22 1841 ran away in London and was found” Signed “Painted by Mr. King” and dated “1829”.

  • Pair New Hall Porcelain Hand Painted Dishes Made England Circa 1800

    $640.00

    This pair of New Hall Porcelain dishes features fabulous hand-painted flowers. The colors and the artistry are exquisite.

    The beautiful flowers are encircled with a thin line of gilt. The borders are decorated with impressed fruits and flowers. On each dish, the edge is trimmed in a purple “ribbon” that ends in a “bow.” Overall they are beautiful and sweet.

    Dimensions: 8.75″ long x 8″ wide.

    Condition: Excellent with several firing spots from when the glaze was thin in the firing.

  • Pair Sèvres Porcelain Tureens with Feuille-de-Choux Pattern Borders 18th Century

    $4,600.00

    Why We Love It!
    The flowers are so beautiful! The bouquets of pink peonies and other flowers are fabulous.

    Sèvres has been called the most important French porcelain manufacturer. We are delighted to offer for sale this exquisite pair of Sèvres soft-paste porcelain tureens made 1773-1782. Decorated with delicate polychrome flowers, it is marked with the exclusive royal cipher in underglaze puce (a crowned interlaced ‘L’ mark), the painter’s mark for Michel-Louis Chauveaux (active 1773–82).
    In 1751 Sèvres became the factory of the King of France, Louis XV.
    The factory produced a lovely white soft-paste porcelain decorated with natural painted flowers in various colors. Porcelains decorated in this style were the most important part of the Sèvres production, especially during the early years. Fine quality and elegant design made these porcelains highly sought after and expensive. Combinations of flowers, including roses, daisies, orange blossoms, violets, hyacinths from Holland, daffodils from Constantinople, lily of the valley, were all used to decorate Sèvres porcelains.
    The painting on our pair of small tureens is exceptional. Note how the polychrome colors of the flowers sink into the white, soft-paste porcelain (see image #2). If one compares the painting on these tureens to the painting on French hard-paste porcelains from later in the 18th-century, one sees that the colors on the hard-paste porcelains do not sink in but seem to rest on top of the porcelain.

    Dimensions: 4 1/4″ x 9 1/2″ x 6″ tall

    Condition: Excellent with some gilt expertly touched in on the unseen place at the top of each tureen where the cover sits (see image #7).

    * See “les porcelainiers du XVIIIe siècle français” with a preface by Serge Gauthier
    ** See “French 18th-century Porcelain at the Wadsworth Atheneum”
    by Linda Roth and Clare Le Corbeiller

  • Pair Wedgwood Black Basalt Urn Neoclassical Made in England Circa 1840

    $6,500.00

    In the late 18th-century, Josiah Wedgwood and his partner Bentley designed the model for this pair of mid-9th century black basalt urns. This Wedgwood pair was made circa 1840.

    The exquisite designs were inspired by original antiquities from vases in the collections amassed by 18th-century English collectors. The urns are decorated with neoclassical scenes of figures in oval medallions. The urns are decorated with garlands of laurel and four medallions depicting: Night, Day, The Dipping of Achilles, and Hope and Plenty. They are further embellished with floral festoons and rams head handles.

    Dimensions: diameter: 7.5″ x 3.75″ across the base x 14″  tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Imari Ice Pails Hand-Painted in Admiral Nelson Pattern England Circa 1810

    $16,300.00

    Coalport Porcelain made this fabulous pair of Admiral Nelson pattern ice pails circa 1810.   The intensity of the Imari colors on the Admiral Nelson pattern is quite remarkable. It is the epitome of Regency decoration.  Hand-painted in England, they are decorated in a traditional, vibrant Imari palette: richly gilded and painted in cobalt blue and iron red.  The decoration is designed in horizontal bands. The scene on the lower part of the tureen shows a traditional Imari image of a vase on a garden terrace. The band above shows a waterside scene with whimsical turquoise water birds, which were never seen in Japanese Imari. The turquoise birds and the pink accents are the distinguishing characteristics of the Coalport Admiral Nelson pattern. The coolers are made of three pieces. The body, the cover, and a liner to hold ice (see image #7).

    Dimensions: 11″ tall x 10″ across the handles x 8.5″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent with some very slight wear to the gilt .

  • Pair Antique Armorial Porcelain Dishes with Armorial of Inglis Made circa 1830

    $700.00

    We are pleased to offer The arms of Inglis on a pair of lovely antique armorial porcelain dishes. These stylized square antique dishes feature the crest of the Inglis family of Scotland. While the armorial is the main feature of the plate, it is further decorated with a double chain along the border, giving greater focus to the armorial and the beautiful bouquet in the center.
    The motto, “Recte faciendo securus,” translates to “[there is] safety in acting justly!

  • Pair Japanese Imari Jars Made in the Meiji Period, Circa 1880

    $3,460.00

    Hand-painted in Imari designs, both jars show beautiful waterside scenes in cobalt blue, gilt, and two tones of iron red. The colors are exquisite and intense. We see water lilies, lotus, peonies, and bellflowers. One jar shows a shoreline the other a cresting wave. Above the main scene on each jar is a medallion with gilded floral decoration. Around the shoulder and the base of each jar is a ring of decoration inspired by Japanese textiles. The hand-painted panels on the reverse echo the panels on the front of the jars but with many subtle changes (see image #8). On the side of each jar, we see a traditional Imari image of a vase on the garden terrace. The pair were made in Japan in the Meiji Period, circa 1880.

    Dimensions: 15″ tall x 7″ diameter at the widest point.

    Condition: Excellent.

  • Pair Antique Spode Oval Shaped Dishes Decorated with Waterlilies England C-1825

    $740.00

    The most exceptional aspect of this pair of dishes is the fabulous gilding lavished over the cobalt borders. As a less prominent feature, the gilding carries throughout the decoration. The bright gold combined with the unexpected use of purple with turquoise and green makes this a stunning pair of dishes. The gilt and exquisite colors jump from the clean white ground of the pearled creamware.

    Dimensions: 11″ long x 7.75″ wide x 2.25″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Large Delft Mantle Vases Painted in Polychrome Colors

    $1,760.00

    Made in the Netherlands circa 1880, this pair of Dutch Delft mantle vases have a traditional double gourd shape. The vases were painted in traditional polychrome colors showing a waterside scene filled with flowers and songbirds. Panels show a waterside scene with long-tailed birds painted yellow, blue, green, and a rich shade of over the glaze iron-red. One bird flies above, and one bird rests among beautiful flowers. Between the panels are segments of bright floral decoration painted on deep cobalt blue ground.

    Dimensions: 17″ tall x 6.75″ diameter at the widest point and 5″ across the octagonal base

    Condition: Excellent with small edge frits invisibly restored

  • Set Hicks and Meigh Ironstone Dinner and Soup Dishes Made England circa 1820

    $720.00

    Made by Hicks and Meigh, this set has six dinner dishes and five matching soup dishes. The decoration is lovely: a butterfly hovers above a flower-filled garden. We see purple peonies and pink fruit tree blossoms emanating from cobalt blue rockwork.

    Dimensions: Both the soups and the dinner dishes measure 10.25″ in diameter

    Condition: Good with some knife marks and rubbing to the glaze

  • Pair Antique Dishes Elephants Image Shows One of Two

    $530.00

    We are pleased to offer this pair of antique English dishes showing an elephant in an Asian setting (see image # 3 to see both dishes in the pair side by side). Made circa 1800, these octagonal pearl glazed creamware dishes feature a lively scene with two figures riding an Indian elephant through an exotic landscape. The combination of several “Asian” style motifs was a common theme in 19th century England. Along a winding road, we see large fruit trees and fenced gardens. The road leads into the distance, where we see a tall pagoda temple.
    The pattern is printed in brown with overglaze enameling in orange, yellow, green, and blue.
    The dishes are unmarked but are similar to the later Wedgwood & Co. “Processional Elephant and Howdah” pattern made in the mid-19th century. Minnie Holdaway suggests that these dishes were the inspiration for the later Wedgwood & Co. pattern since they date to the early 19th century.
    Dimensions: 9 inches diameter x 1 inch height
    Condition: Excellent                 Price: $530 for the pair of dishes
    References: Holdaway, Minnie. The Wares of Ralph Wedgwood. English Ceramic Circle Transactions Vol. 12 Part 3. London: The Lincoln’s Inn Press Ltd, 1986.

  • Pair of Crazy Cow Antique Creamware Dishes England circa 1810

    $830.00

    We are pleased to offer this pair of dishes in the popular Crazy Cow pattern.
    Made by Minton circa 1810, the pearl-glazed creamware dishes are hand-painted in bright colors featuring a dragon-like mythical animal in the central rondel. This is a lively, whimsical pattern.

    Dimensions: 10.5 inches x 7.25 inches

    Condition: Excellent

     

  • Dozen Ashworth Dinner Plates Makers of Mason’s Ironstone England Circa 1880

    $5,200.00

    In 1861 Mason’s Ironstone was bought by Ashworth Brothers Ltd., who continued to produce “Mason’s Ironstone.”
    This set of stunning dinner plates (10.25″ in diameter) has borders decorated with exquisite white lilies on clean black ground.
    Painted in enamels, the white flowers jump off the black ground.
    The details of the decoration, the red lines on the flowers, the green and yellow leaves, and the gilding all add to the beauty of each dish.

    Dimensions:10.25″ in diameter
    Condition: Excellent

  • Three First Period Worcester Brocade Pattern Dishes England circa 1775

    $3,880.00

    Known as the “Brocade” pattern, the design on these exquisite eighteenth-century dishes is complicated yet delicate. The inspiration for this pattern comes from seventeenth-century Japanese patterns. We see dragons, flowering prunus, and bolts of fabric with mons. The center has a sizeable gilt chrysanthemum flower head, and the border has a golden rim line with a lobed edge.
    Made by Worcester during the “First Period” when the factory was under the supervision of Dr. Wall circa 1770.
    The reverse of each dish with the Worcester gold crescent mark.
    Several years ago, we had in the shop a single dish in this model with the collection label for the Iman Smallwood Collection.
    Also see: Simon Spero and John Sandon in Worcester Porcelain, 1751-1790, The Zorensky Collection image #273 pg. 234 for an example of this pattern in a shell-shaped dish.
    Diameter: 8.25.”
    Condition: Excellent
    Price:
    $3,880 for the set of three dishes.
    $2,600 for the pair of round dishes.
    $1,280 for the heart-shaped dish.

  • Blue and White Pair Large Japanese Jars Meiji Period Circa 1880

    $4,200.00

    Hand-painted on each large jar, a songbird sits perched on a lush flowering fruit tree while two birds fly above.
    The jars are mirror images of one another.
    The painter used underglaze cobalt blue on creamy white porcelain to create a beautiful all-around garden scene.
    Along the top edge of each jar is a blue band with scrolling vines and flowers that matches a band on each cover.
    Along the base is another decorative band of blue.
    Dimensions: 20″ tall x 10″ diameter at the widest point x 5.15″ diameter at the base
    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Jar Hand-Painted Circa Circa 1780

    $1,730.00

    This large blue and white Delft jar is hand-painted showing beautiful flower-filled baskets on white tin-glazed ground.
    We see sunflowers and tulips overflowing baskets alongside floral decoration with scrolling vines.
    The ribbed body sits on a traditional octagonal base. The ribbing adds life to the decoration as light plays over the curves.
    Across the middle of the jar, we see a band of cobalt blue with panels of flowers.
    The underside of the jar has a typical 18th-century mark “2” used in the factory to denote this particular size and shape jar.

    Dimensions: 17″ tall x 8.5″ diameter x 5″ across base
    Condition: Excellent

  • Dutch Delft Garniture Five Pieces Polychrome Made Circa 1880

    $3,200.00

    This charming Dutch Delft garniture comprises two beaker vases and three baluster-form jars with their covers.
    It is in excellent condition.
    We see a romantic countryside scene with a shepherdess and sheep. Sitting comfortably in the shade of a large tree, she holds her staff and looks out onto a spacious grassy meadow.
    In the background, we see a castle turret to her left and a church and steeple on her right.
    The scene evokes the romantic feeling of the 18th century.
    To create the scene, the painter used soft earth tone colors: two shades of blue, green, iron-red, yellow, and manganese.
    The scene is bordered with a molded bright yellow and manganese cartouche with manganese flowers at the head and base. The reverse side of each vase has green leafy branches and red flowers. Each cover is painted with a yellow flower and surmounted by a traditional lion finial.

    Dimensions: The covered vases are 15″ tall x 7″ wide x 4.25″ deep at the base. The open vases are 10″ tall x 5.5″ wide x 3.75″ deep at the base.
    Condition Excellent: small edge frits are invisibly restored

  • German Faience Pierced Basket Made by Johann Jacob Kaiser Circa 1808

    $340.00

    This attractive white faience basket has an oval pierced body around a solid bottom.
    It is modeled on a wicker basket, a popular motif for late 18th and early 19th-century Continental ceramics.
    Made to hold bread, this was a valuable item at the kitchen table in the morning.
    The basket was manufactured circa 1808 at the Durlach factory in Germany. At that time, Durlach (Baden) was one of many German centers of faience production.
    The Durlach factory was founded In 1723 by J H Wackenfeld. Until 1818 there was no factory mark, but artists signed their work; among the most prominent was Johann Jacob Kaiser (1773–1835), who signed his works with a black “K” (see Image #6).
    After 1818 the factory’s earthenware was marked “Durlach.”*
    Dimensions: 7.25 length x 5.2″ width x 2.5” height
    Condition: Excellent with small original firing defects on the basket floor (see image #3).

    The underside with paper label for the Sammlung Collection
    * See: E. Petrasch: Durlacher Fayencen, 1723×847 (exh. cat., Karlsruhe, Bad. Landesmus., 1975) Durlacher Fayencen (exh. cat., Mannheim, Städt. Reiss-Mus., 1978) R. Simmermacher

  • Set of Ten Baby Blue Plates Made by Ridgway in England Circa 1830

    $1,100.00

    Ridgway made this set of ten lovely baby blue dessert plates in England circa 1830.
    The plates are impeccably styled: the baby blue is paired with crisp white porcelain and golden trim.
    The cool color palette of baby blue stands out on this elegant pattern.
    The bone china porcelain is of fine quality.
    The marks on the underside of the dishes show the distinctive Ridgway pattern number system using fractions painted in iron red.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter x .75″ height
    Condition: Each plate in the set is in excellent condition. Two plates have very slight rubbing to the gilded outer edge (see images).

  • Four Antique English Porcelain Shell Shaped Dishes Made Circa 1810

    $1,520.00

    WHY WE LOVE IT: The founder of Bardith, Edith Wolf, always said, “Miles Mason never made a piece of porcelain that wasn’t beautiful.”
    This group of four shell-shaped dishes was made in the Regency period, circa 1810. Like many of Miles Mason’s best designs, this pattern has flair. It is one of his finest patterns. The two pairs of dishes are fully painted with pink and orange flowers with green leaves. The unexpected combination of pink with orange highlighted with green makes this a gorgeous pattern.
    Placed in a cabinet or on a wall, these dishes will make an entire room come alive.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ tall x 8″ wide

    Condition: Excellent

  • Five Antique Chinese Porcelain Saucers Made Circa 1770

    $1,220.00

    This set of antique Chinese porcelain saucers features beautiful peonies hand-painted in monochrome purple.
    Peonies symbolize prosperity, good luck, love, and honor in Chinese tradition. The color purple symbolizes love and spiritual awareness.
    The saucers were made circa 1770, during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor.

    Dimensions: 4.3″ in diameter x 1″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Antique French Porcelain Baskets Made Circa 1840

    $4,250.00

    A pair of French Paris Porcelain baskets decorated with brown grape leaves on a light caramel ground. The exquisite neoclassical grape leaf design gets its inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman decorations. The latticework of the baskets lends delicacy and light to the design. Baskets like these first became popular in France during the reign of King Louis Philippe from 1830-1848.

    Dimensions: 9″ tall x 8.75″ across the top

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of Antique French Porcelain Baskets

    $4,250.00

    Made in France circa 1870, this beautiful pair of Paris Porcelain baskets are classic French style.
    They are elegant and formal with exquisite gilt on crisp white porcelain.
    The one decorative touch is a lovely small band of chevrons around the middle of each basket (see image #3).
    The latticework of the baskets enhances their delicacy and adds light to the design.
    Baskets like these first became popular in France during the reign of King Louis Philippe from 1830-1848.

    Dimensions: 8.5″ height x 8.75″ diameter across the top

    Condition: Excellent

  • Very Large Blue and White Delft Jar Belgium Circa 1880

    $2,600.00

    This fabulous Delft jar is painted with traditional deep cobalt blue on a tin-glazed ground.
    The jar has six panels, which alternate between flowers in a basket and ferns with scrolling vines.
    Large blue lappets decorate the shoulders and cover.
    The jar was made by Boch Frères Keramis in La Louvière, Belgium circa 1880.
    Belgium was part of The Netherlands until 1831, and many of the early workers at Boch Frères Keramis were hired away from Dutch Delft factories. Begun in 1844, Boch Frères Keramis won a gold medal at the exhibition of the Belgian industry In 1847.
    The underside of the vase is marked BFK.

    Dimensions: Height 19.5″ x 9.25″ diameter at the widest point x 5.5″ diameter at the base

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of Large Blue and White Delft Jars Made Belgium Circa 1880

    $4,660.00

    This pair of large Delft jars has a traditional blue flower decoration painted on a white tin-glaze ground.
    Each jar is hand-painted, showing beautiful flowers.
    The shoulders and cover were decorated in a traditional style with floral panels separated by “diamonds.”
    The jars were made by Boch Frères Keramis in La Louvière, Belgium.
    Belgium was part of The Netherlands until 1831, and many of the early workers at Boch Frères Keramis were hired away from Dutch Delft factories. Begun in 1844, Boch Frères Keramis won a gold medal at the exhibition of the Belgian industry In 1847.
    The underside of each jar is marked. From the marks, we date the jars to circa 1880-1890.

    Dimensions: Height 19.5″ x diameter at the widest point 9.75″ x diameter at the base 5″.

    Condition: Excellent

  • 18th Century French Soft Paste Porcelain Mennecy Blush Pot Hand-Painted

    $2,100.00

    We are pleased to offer this beautiful Mennecy blush pot ‘Pot à Fard’ made circa 1750.
    It is decorated with sprays of flowers, the finial shaped as a single purple rose with green leaves.
    The flowers are hand-painted in rich enamel colors, among them the distinctive Mennecy purple-rose hue, shown in figure #1, especially on the rose form finial. Another color associated with Mennecy is the most beautiful green found on the raised leaves of the rose finial and on the leaves surrounding the flowers.
    This pot is particularly appealing because the painting of the flowers is so robust. Envisioning it in a woman’s toilette seems the epitome of femininity and Romanticism. In the 18th century, it would have been found on the vanity of an aristocratic lady, where it was primarily used to hold creams and lotions for the face.
    The Mennecy Porcelain Manufactory was one of the first French porcelain factories. From 1735 until 1773, the factory produced Fine quality soft-paste porcelain wares. French soft-paste porcelains date to the early attempts by European potters to replicate Chinese porcelain by using mixtures of clay and glass frit. Like our pot, the body of the early Mennecy soft-paste wares has a creamy tone.
    There was no gilding at Mennecy. Instead, like our pot, the rims were painted in tones of pink and purple.
    The Mennecy, factory under the protection of the Duc de Villeroy, marked many of its porcelains with an incised “DV” on the underside.
    Our pot is marked with an incised “DV”; however, an image of the “DV” mark does not have enough resolution to post here.

    Provenance: Estate of John F. Ball, Greenwich, CT.

    Dimensions: 3.75″ tall x 3″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Ironstone Bowl Made England Circa 1870

    $480.00

    This lovely bowl is decorated with a beautiful garden scene showing a blossoming fruit tree rising from blue rockwork, oversized white and pink peonies, ochre-colored chrysanthemums, and a butterfly hovering above.
    This beautiful central scene is encircled by a blue border with scrolling vines and flower heads.
    Flowers on the vine decorate the sides of the bowl, and the edge is decorated with “diamonds” and flowers.
    The design is timeless with enduring appeal.

    Dimensions: 14.5″ long x 11.25″ wide x 2.75″ deep

    Condition: Very good: with very slight rubbing to the enamels and slight knife marks that are not ordinarily visible without very close inspection (see images)

  • Blue and White Pearled Creamware Sugar Box

    $285.00

    This lovely pearlware sugar box has the timeless appeal of soothing blue and white. Made in England in the early 19th century with blue decoration applied by hand. Each design is slightly different, especially in the intensity of the blue.

    Dimensions: 4.75″ tall x 5.25″ wide

    Condition: Excellent

  • Chinese Blue and White Small Vase Made of Soft-Paste Porcelain

    $760.00

    This delicate Chinese blue and white bud vase was made in the early18th century. Hand-painted in shades of cobalt blue, it shows peonies emanating from rockwork. The vase has an elegant, slender form that rises to a flared lotus form rim. It is supported on an oval-shaped foot. The body has a milky-white glaze, which crackled when fired (see image #s 2.5.6)

    Dimensions: 5″ in height x 2.6″ across x .8″ deep

    Condition: Excellent with the very, very slightest roughness on the upper edge.

  • Glass Wedding Bell Blue with White Stripes Made England, Circa 1840

    $760.00

    This handmade blown glass wedding bell was made in England at the Nailsea Glassworks, circa 1840. It has exquisite deep blue coloring with a crisp line of white glass wrapped around it (see images #2 and #5). The blue and white opaque twist in the handle was created with threads of blue and white glass pulled up and twisted in the interior of the handle as the glass was blown (see images #3 and #6). The bell has its original glass clapper which is quite rare (see image #4).

    Dimensions: 11″ in height x 5″ in diameter across the base

    Condition: Excellent

  • Chinese Blue and White Porcelain Platter Hand-Painted, 18th Century, Circa 1770

    $1,600.00

    This exquisite Chinese blue and white porcelain platter was hand-painted in the Qianlong dynasty in the 18th century. It has the timeless appeal of beautiful flowers blooming in a garden. We see a fence, willow tree, rockwork, and large peonies, which seem to float above the garden, all painted in deep cobalt blue. The border decoration has intricate patterning with wave and diamond pattern designs. The shape of the platter is a traditional Chinese export cut-cornered rectangle.

    Dimensions: 14″ x 10.5″ x 1″height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Antique Chinese Porcelain Bowl Famille Rose Made circa 1900

    $870.00

    This lovely 19th century Famille Rose bowl was painted in shades of purple, orange, and green. The outside of the bowl features a band of purple diamond pattern with inset panels of blooming peonies and smaller panels with monochrome orange landscapes. Below the purple band we see butterflies and sprigs of flowers. Inside the bowl a larger sprig of blooming peonies sits in the well. In Chinese tradition, peonies are known as the king of flowers and symbolize royalty and wealth.

    Dimensions: 4.5 in. H x 10.25 in. Dm

    Condition: Good: with a single almost invisible 3″ hairline restored in the colored band

  • Pair French 18th Century Soft-Paste Porcelain Pots Made by Mennecy

    $2,100.00

    Provenance: A New England Estate
    Hand-painted in the 18th century circa 1765 these beautiful Mennecy Porcelain soft-paste pomade pots are rare. Pots like this held rich creams and lotions for the face. They would have been placed on the vanity of an aristocratic lady. Both the body and the cover have lovely spiral fluting and are decorated with flowers painted in exquisite enamel colors, especially the distinctive purple-rose hue seen on the body and the cover. Each cover is topped with a fabulous strawberry finial. The underside of both pots is marked with an incised “DV.”

    Dimensions. height 3.75 inches x diameter 2.35 inches

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Mochaware Pitcher Blue and Black Slip Decoration Made England, Circa 1830

    $1,700.00

    Provenance: From The D H & S E Miller Collection
    We are pleased to offer this large antique mochaware pitcher made in England circa 1830. This large, barrel-shaped, mochaware pitcher is machine turned and slip banded. Eighteen thin black bands set off the three prominent blue bands. The colors blue and black are an excellent combination. The handle has remarkably crisp acanthus leaf terminals.

    Dimensions: 7.3″ tall x 5.8″ diameter at the widest point

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Square Drabware Dishes Made England, Circa 1830

    $480.00

    This pair of drabware dishes has a rich earth tone color. The John Ridgway factory made these dishes in England circa 1830. Pressed out in a mold, these eye-catching drabware dishes have raised neoclassical decoration around a central roundel. Drabware is unlike other pottery. The rich color of all drabware stems from the fact that each piece is created using dark clay rather than white clay. Transparent glaze over the dark clay produces drabware’s naturally rich, saturated color.

    Dimensions: 8″ x 8″ x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Charger 18th Century, Circa 1780

    $580.00

    Made in the last quarter of the 18th century, this Dutch Delft charger is decorated with deep cobalt blue on white ground. It has a floral center that forms a five-pointed star. Around the center is an elaborate floral and foliate border. The eye-catching design radiates outward from the center to the two bands of floral decoration. On the reverse is a typical 18th century Delft blue factory mark showing the number “5”.

    Dimensions: 13.5″ in diameter x 2″ height

    Condition: Several very small glaze flakes restored to the rim; scattered age typical glaze lines and a glaze skip from the making (see image #5).

  • Delft Blue and White Charger Handpainted 18th Century circa 1780 by “The Axe”

    $1,400.00

    This lovely 18th century Dutch Delft charger was made at “The Axe” factory. The center shows a vibrant garden scene hand-painted in deep cobalt blue. The decoration is crisp. Much of it was painted in medium blue and then outlined in deeper blue. Flower buds and flowerheads fill the central space. On the border are ten panels, each with a single flower. The underside shows the mark of “The Axe” (De Porceleyne Bijl).

    Dimensions: 14″ in diameter

    Condition: Excellent: the blue on the edge touched in to invisibly restore small edge frits.

  • Pair of Staffordshire Ironstone Dishes Made in England, Circa 1825

    $530.00

    Made circa 1825, this pair of eye-catching dishes features a lovely orange lotus blossom at the center and six pink and orange lotus blossoms decorating the border. Each blossom sits above cobalt blue leaves, lined with gilt. Small green leaves add a pop of color to the white ground. The central flower is separated from the border by two decorative bands of color: one orange and the other cobalt blue. A gentle lobed and gadrooned edge completes the decoration.

    Dimensions: 10.25″ in diameter x 1.75″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Six Blue and White Chinese Porcelain Dishes Kangxi Era Made c-1700

    $5,800.00

    These six beautiful Chinese blue and white porcelain dishes were painted in the Kangxi era circa 1700. Hand-painted using both soft and dark cobalt blue, each dish is very slightly different from the others in the set. The decoration is exquisite. At the center of each dish, there are two flowering peonies emanating from rockwork. On the border surrounding the peonies are other flowers including chrysanthemums, and plum blossoms. These dishes have meaning in Chinese tradition. Peonies are much loved for their bold size and colors. They are known as the flower of “riches and honor.”* Chrysanthemums symbolize abundance, while plum blossoms symbolize endurance and hope*. The dishes are molded, and the border of each plate is fluted in a pattern similar to the petals on a flower. The total effect is delightful.

    Dimensions: 8″ in diameter x 1” in height

    Condition: Excellent with minor frits on the foot of each dish

    *See “Chinese Art A Guide to Motifs and Visual Imagery” by P B Welch.

  • Small Drabware Vase Neoclassical Design Made England, Circa 1830

    $760.00

    Ridgway made this drabware vase in England circa 1830. Pressed out in a mold, this eye-catching vase has high-relief neoclassical decoration consisting of Roman-style portraits under a band of grape leaves on the vine. The handles are in the form of intertwined branches. This elegant design is finished with an egg and dart decoration around the top edge. Drabware is unlike other pottery. The rich color of all drabware stems from the fact that each piece is created using dark clay rather than white clay. Transparent glaze over the clay produces drabware’s naturally rich, saturated color.

    Dimensions: 7″ across the handles x 4.75″ diameter x 5.25″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Creamware Dishes 18th Century England Painted in Pink & Purple Made c-1770

    $720.00

    We are pleased to offer this lovely pair of 18th century English creamware dishes made circa 1780. Decorated in enamels, both plates
    feature a chinoiserie scene. In conversation, we see two fashionably dressed women, a small child holding a pinwheel as he looks up, pointing to a group of chimes, and an older boy standing nearby. And at the far right, we see another boy seated with a parrot on his arm.
    Dimensions: 9.5 inches diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $720 for the pair
    History of creamware
    Creamware was created in the 1760s by Josiah Wedgwood. He was the first of the English potters to produce a cream-colored earthenware with a light-colored body. Wedgwood marketed these wares as Queensware after Queen Charlotte gave Wedgwood the honor of ordering a set. As its popularity increased, many of the other English potters began to make creamware as well. It replaced saltglaze stoneware as the dinnerware of all but the high aristocracy, which most likely would have had a service of Chinese export porcelain dishes.

  • Set of Four Wedgwood Dessert Dishes Showing a Pair of Ducks Made England c-1820

    $560.00

    We are pleased to offer this set of four Wedgwood dessert dishes showing a simply beautiful scene with a pair of ducks by the water’s edge. Nearby are a flowering fruit tree and rockwork painted in Imari colors of iron red, cobalt blue, and glistening gold. The artist has left much of the surface unpainted, allowing the crisp, clean white of the pottery to show.
    The dishes were made by Wedgwood in England, circa 1820.

    Dimensions: diameter 8″                      Condition: Excellent                  Price: $560 for the four dishes

  • Caughley Blue and White Mask-Spout Pitcher Printed Flowers

    $700.00

    Caughley made this blue and white pitcher in England, in the mid 18th century, circa 1765. Around the time that this pitcher was made English porcelain makers discovered the technique for printing on porcelain. Caughley made several exquisite blue and white porcelain pieces with flower prints that were clean and sharp. The pitcher is crisply molded with overlapping cabbage leaves. The spout is molded with the traditional mask face of a bearded man.

    Dimensions: 7.75″ tall

    Condition: Excellent

    Ref: Geoffrey Godden in his book on Caughley and Worcester porcelains calls this print a “rare design.”

  • Pair Spode Shell-Shaped Dishes Orange and Blue Early 19th Century, Circa 1820

    $580.00

    Spode made this pair of fine quality shell-shaped dishes in England in the early 19th century, circa 1820. The dishes were printed in shades of orange and blue Orange and blue is the traditional color combination of Imari porcelains first exported from Japan to Europe in the mid 17th century. Here the use of these two colors is simply elegant. The design shows a traditional garden scene with blue rockwork, orange peonies and chrysanthemums, and bamboo. decorated with both orange and blue leaves.

    Dimensions: 10 long x 8.5″ wide x 2″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Newhall Boy in the Window Pattern Bowl, England, Circa 1810

    $480.00

    This 6″ diameter bowl is a small gem. Decorated with New Hall’s beautiful boy in the window pattern it was made circa 1810. The boy in the window pattern is English chinoiserie at its most lovely. This colorful bowl shows a young boy standing at the window of his home looking out at two friends. The boys are watched over by his mother or governess.

    Dimensions: 6″ in diameter x 2.75″ tall

    Condition: excellent

  • Large Salt-Glaze Charger 18th Century England circa 1765

    $940.00

    This salt-glazed stoneware charger is an exquisite piece of early Americana.* The floral design on the border is graceful and charming showing a variety of flowers on the vine. It was made in England. In the mid 18th century stoneware was a staple of trade between America and England. England sent America manufactured products, such as this salt-glazed charger, and in return purchased agricultural products from the American colonies.

    Diameter: 15″

    *The pattern on this charger is a variation of pattern S6. CWF,1994-9 that was recovered archaeologically at Colonial Williamsburg. S6. CWF,1994-9 is cataloged by E Skerry in “Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America”. An image can be found on page 238.

  • Set Ten Neoclassical Plates w/ Acanthus Leaf Decoration Copeland Spode England

    $1,520.00

    This set of ten neoclassical plates was made for dessert or salad. They measure 8.5″ in diameter. The plates are decorated with a simple, elegant acanthus leaf design painted in burnt orange, light orange, and gold. Acanthus leaves form the medallion at the center and a wreath along the border of each plate. The plates were made in England in the mid-20th century circa 1960 and retailed by the premiere 20th century London porcelain shop, T Goode & Co. Ltd. The Copeland Spode stamp on the back of each plate shows that the plates were made between 1960-1963.

  • Large Salt Glazed Charger 18th Century Made in England circa 1765

    $860.00

    Provenance: The Collection of Sir Samuel Hoare*
    This large and exquisite salt-glazed charger was made in Staffordshire, England, in the 18th century circa 1765. The design is elegant and straightforward: the only decoration is the lobed and gadrooned edge. Press-molded, salt-glazed chargers, plates, dishes, and other service pieces filled the cupboards and dining rooms of middle and upper-class English and American homes from the mid-1740s until the end of the 18th century. The advent of this white stoneware dinnerware instigated a tabletop revolution.

    Diameter: 15″

    *A paper label on the back of the charger (see image #6)
    **J Skerry “Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America.”
    ***For an image of this type of charger recovered archaeologically at Colonial Williamsburg, see J Skerry “Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America.” page 231.

  • Sevres Porcelain Bottle Cooler Hand-Painted 18th Century, Circa 1773-1782

    $3,860.00

    Sèvres was the royal factory of Louis XV and Louis XVI, Kings of France from 1715-1793. The Sèvres factory was known to have the best painters and gilders in 18th century France. This stunning Sèvres 18th century double bottle cooler was hand-painted with exquisite sprigs of spring flowers (see images). The underside is marked in underglaze blue with the Sèvres intertwined “L” and the letter “L” for painter’s mark for Michel-Louis Chavereaux, who was active at Sèvres from 1773-1782. The decoration is delicate, and the modeling and gilding are exceptional.

    The cooler measures 12.5″ (31.75 cm) across the handles x 5.75″ (14.6 cm) deep x 4.75″ (12 cm) in height.

    Condition: Excellent

  • Large Pierced Creamware Charger by Leeds Pottery 18th Century England c-1785

    $2,300.00

    This magnificent creamware charger was made at the Leeds Pottery in Yorkshire, England, circa 1785.
    Hand-pressed from a mold, it has exquisite piercings and a beaded edge.
    Dimensions: 14.75″ in diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $2,300
    The underside is marked LEEDS POTTERY (impressed).
    For an image of this pattern on a Leeds Pottery plate, see image 571 on pg 144 in Creamware and Other English Pottery at Temple Newsam House Leeds by Peter Walton, where he notes “Yorkshire 1780s-1790s” for this creamware design.
    Please note that the last image in the series, which is hard to read, is the underside of the charger.

  • Large Mochaware Mug with Wavy Line Slip Decoration England Circa 1820

    $3,400.00

    Made in England circa 1820, this beauty has a lively design. The large center band is decorated with wavy lines of white slip over a band of milk chocolate colored slip.
    Above and below the main band are blue bands of slip, and just below the top edge is a band of green glazed impressed herringbone design.
    Dimensions: 6″ tall x 4.25″ diameter
    Condition: Excellent
    Price: $3,400

  • Mochaware Pitcher Mocha Ware Milk Chocolate Color Made England Circa 1815

    $1,360.00

    This mochaware pitcher is decorated with bands of lovely milk chocolate-colored slip.
    This color works beautifully with the unpainted creamware body of the handle and interior of the pitcher.
    Just below the top edge, we see a band of black and white rouletting, and above the bottom edge is a similar black and white rouletted band.
    Dimensions: 5.75″ tall x 4″ at the widest point
    Condition: Good: two short hairlines of approximately half an inch are seen on either side of the top edge. There is a hairline on the underside which does not go through.
    Price: $1360
    Background of Mochaware: Mochaware pottery is slip-decorated, lathe-turned, earthenware with bands of colored slip applied to buff-colored or white bodies

  • Pair of Early 19th Century Wedgwood Rosso Antico Jardinieres

    $4,000.00

    A pair of rosso antico jardinières made by Wedgwood, ca. 1810. This pair of jardinieres has a beautiful basketweave pattern accentuated by black basalt details in the Egyptian Revival style.

    Dimensions: 5 1/2 in. Dm x 6 3/4 in. H (13.9 cm Dm x 17.8 cm H)

    Condition: Excellent. Segment of lack rope-twist band on back of one jardinière missing, measuring 0.7 cm.

    References: Wedgwood Museum, 1319.

  • 18th Century Italian Doccia Porcelain Dinner Service

    $4,000.00

    A dinner service comprising six dinner dishes and six soup dishes made by the Doccia Porcelain Manufactory, circa 1750.

    Italy was the site of Europe’s first porcelain production: in Florence between 1575 and 1587 under the patronage of Francesco I de’ Medici. The Doccia Porcelain Manufactory, founded nearly 200 years later, continued the tradition of Italian porcelain with a hard-paste body that was later glazed with a tin glaze. This dinner set is decorated with the al tulipano motif, a design that is one of the most prevalent in Doccia wares. The central flower is not a tulip but an interpretation of the peonies used in the Chinese Famille Rose porcelain.

    Dimensions:
    – Soup dishes: 9 1/4 in. diameter x 1 1/2 in. height (23.1 cm diameter x 3.8 cm height)
    – Dinner dishes: 9 1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. height (23.1 cm diameter x 2.4 cm height)

    Condition: Excellent. Light wear to enamels throughout commensurate with age and use. Faint use marks visible on some dishes. One dinner plate with chip to underside of rim measuring 1 cm.

    Note: 1 dinner dish and 2 soup dishes are not transparent, a characteristic of porcelain. These 3 dishes are porcelain with a tin glaze which makes them opaque and dates them to 1790-1800.

  • Early Derby Porcelain Coffee Can att. to George Robertson, circa 1795

    $3,200.00

    A green-ground porcelain coffee can made by the Derby Porcelain Factory circa 1795. This green-ground coffee can is a fine example of early Derby porcelain. The shipwreck scene, titled on the bottom “A Shipwreck after a Storm” in hand-written script, is attributed to the painter George Robertson. The gilding, executed by Joseph Stables, remains in pristine condition.

    Condition: Excellent. Small rim chip measuring 0.4 cm with associated in-painting of gilt.

    Dimensions: 2 1/2 in. H x 2 7/8 in. Dm (6.4 cm H x 6.9 cm Dm)

    Provenance:
    Private English collection
    Mellors & Kirk, Nottingham, 4/30/2009, lot 106
    Thence by family descent

  • Early 19th Century Creil French Mochaware Coffee Pot

    $1,900.00

    A Creil mochaware peach-colored coffee pot made circa 1810.

    This elegant coffee pot features a dark brown mocha design on a light peach body. Mochaware was developed in Staffordshire in the late 18th century, but spread to continental Europe through the Middle-Eastern moss agate trade. Moss agate stones, which sport a similar tree-like design, were exported to the West through the port of al Makha, translated in English to “Mocha.” While moss agates were used as semiprecious stones in jewelry and objets de vertu for the upper classes, their dendrite design inspired potters such as Creil to create mochawares for more quotidian usage.

    Dimensions: 10 in. H x 6 1/4 at widest point (25.4 cm H x 15.9 cm W)

    Condition: Excellent visual condition, with invisible professional restoration to cover and spout. Some minor staining to clay body under the glaze on the foot.

  • 19th Century Minton Ornithological Porcelain Dessert Service

    $2,900.00

    A partial dessert service by Minton, hand-painted with ornithological scenes after designs by Joseph Smith. The service comprises two small compotes and four dessert dishes.

    This Minton dessert service is a stunning example of English porcelain craftsmanship. Intricate apple-green lattice designs are enhanced with gilding. The compotes’ feet and dishes’ rims are reticulated, further contributing to the set’s delicacy. The reticulated shape is known as the “Devon” shape. The most special feature of this service, however, are the meticulously rendered (and labeled) ornithological scenes, which point to a 19th-century spirit of scientific classification. One dish features the impressed wheel date mark for 1872.

    Dimensions:
    Compotes – 6 1/2 in. Dm x 4 1/2 in. H (11.8 cm H x 16 cm D)
    Dishes – 9 1/4 in. Dm x 3/4 in. H (2 cm H x 23 cm D)

    Condition: Excellent. Some light staining to the body of one plate.

  • Early 19th Century Orange English Mochaware Waste Bowl

    $1,900.00

    An English mochaware waste bowl in the London shape with cable or “earthworm” decoration, dating to circa 1820.

    Developed in Staffordshire in the late 18th century, dipped wares utilized colored liquid clay slips to create surprisingly modern abstract and geometric motifs. This small waste bowl features a cable design with marbled colors of dark brown, blue, and white slip on an orange ground. The bowl’s rim has a rouletted band of chevrons lightly glazed in green. The bright color palette of this bowl dates it to an earlier period of production, circa 1820. Later dipped wares have much more subdued colors.

    Condition: The bowl is in very good condition, with two tiny chips to the rim each measuring approximately 0.2 cm in length. The underside of the base has some glaze flaking. There is a hairline circular crack in the well of the bowl.

    Dimensions: 4 5/8 in. diameter x 2 1/2 in. height (11.8 cm diameter x 6.6 cm height).

  • Pair of Chamberlains Worcester English Porcelain Armorial Dishes

    $1,400.00

    A pair of English porcelain soup dishes made by Chamberlains Worcester circa 1825.

    Made circa 1825, this pair of porcelain soup dishes is an excellent example of the stunning quality and artistry for which Chamberlains Worcester is known. Gorgeous, hand-painted flowers appear against a baby blue ground, with spectacular ornamental gilding throughout. The plates’ central crest and monogram indicate that they were made for John Paine Tudway, Member of Parliament for Wells, Somerset, providing us with a rare opportunity of original provenance.

    Dimensions: 9 1/2 in. Dm x 2 in. H (24 cm Dm x 4.8 cm H)

    Condition: Excellent. Very minor wear to gilding. Some areas of light stacking wear in the bowls.

    Provenance: John Paine Tudway, The Cedars, Wells, Somerset

    References: Fairbairn, James. Book of Crests of the Great Families of Great Britain and Ireland. 4th ed., rev. and enl. London: T.C. & E.C. Jack, 1905.

  • Set of 11 Early Spode Ironstone Imari Dessert Dishes Made circa 1815

    $1,650.00

    A set of 11 Imari style ironstone dessert dishes, made by Spode circa 1815.

    Josiah Spode II began producing stone china in 1813 as an alternative to porcelain. Stone china, also known as ironstone due to its hard and durable fabric, became famous for its porcelain-like greyish blue glaze and glassy surface. So popular was this new medium that Queen Charlotte purchased her own stone china service from Spode’s Portugal Street showroom. These dessert dishes are early examples of Spode Stone China; in 1822 the company introduced an improved body marketed as “New Stone,” and thereafter items were branded as such.

    Dishes are marked with pattern number 2283 in iron red and feature the printed Spode Stone China mark in underglaze blue.

    Dimensions: 8 in. Dm x 1/2 in. H (20.3 cm Dm x 1.4 cm H)

    Condition: Excellent overall. Light wear to some enamels and gilding on dishes commensurate with age and use. The plates with the least and most amounts of wear are pictured.

  • Early 19th Century Spode Porcelain Regency Punch Bowl

    $4,000.00

    An early Spode Regency style punch bowl made circa 1810 and decorated in an Imari palette of deep blue, iron red, light peach, green with gilt details. The bowl features beautifully hand-painted floral decorations and an early Spode mark with the pattern number 1645 hand-painted on the base in iron red.

    Condition: Very good. Light scratching in well of the bowl from original use.

    Dimensions: 4 3/4 in H x 11 in D (12 cm H x 28.3 cm D)

    References: Smithsonian, National Museum of American History, 225282.

  • Pair of Worcester Porcelain Square Dishes Flight Barr & Barr England, circa 1820

    $920.00

    This pair of beautiful George IV porcelain squares was made in the Flight Barr and Barr Worcester factory circa 1820. The flowers are hand-painted. The colors are exquisite. In the center is a beautiful bouquet with two flowers; one a lovely shade of orange, the other a stunning pink. The fabulous gold gilding on the gadrooned edge is unparalleled. It is the best! The crisp white porcelain and the cobalt blue of the leaves in the decoration allow the orange and pink flowers to show beautifully.

  • Pair Worcester Porcelain Pink and Gold Dinner Plates England circa 1820

    $520.00

    The sweetness of the beautiful pink band is tempered by the brown leaves and berries and the gilded vines surrounding it. The bright white porcelain allows the pink enamels and the gilding to stand out. Flight Barr Barr Worcester made these fine quality dinner dishes in the Regency style circa 1820. The gilded edge line and gadrooned edge add excitement to this Regency period design.

    Dimensions: 9.5″ diameter 1″ height

    Condition: Excellent

    Each dish is marked on the underside with FBB under an impressed crown showing that Flight Barr Barr were suppliers to their Majesties the King and Queen of Great Britain.

  • Set of Six Large Blue and White Delft Chargers Hand-Painted 18th-Century

    $8,400.00

    This group makes a true blue statement. The deep cobalt blue is fabulous!  This set of six Dutch Delft chargers are hand-painted in the “Theeboom” pattern showing a tea plant with a fan-shaped bouquet of leaves and flowers. This is one of the most exquisite hand-painted designs made on Delft chargers in the 18th century, which explains why it was so popular. The pattern is lush and full of color. The deep blue decoration fills the charger. On the border are floral decorations and scroll designs. The white edges are delicately scalloped, adding another beautiful dimension to each charger. The chargers have the mark of De Klaauw “The Claw” for Delft made in the last quarter of the 18th century, or for LPK for De Porceleyne Lampetkan 1778-1811.     For an image and discussion of a group of Delft chargers with this pattern, see E B Schapp, Delft Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art pages 74 and 75.

    Dimensions: 13.5″-14.25″ in diameter        Condition: Excellent with very small edge frits invisibly restored            Price: $8,400 for the group

  • Wedgwood Creamware Platter or Charger 18th Century Made in England Circa 1785

    $365.00

    This Wedgwood creamware round platter or charger was made in 18th century England circa 1785. The border is decorated with a traditional neoclassical design of iron-red flower heads connected by midnight brown “diamonds”.

    Diameter: 12″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Mantle Jar Hand-Painted 18th Century Netherlands Circa 1780

    $1,220.00

    A blue and white Dutch Delft mantle jar hand-painted in exquisite deep cobalt blue. We see a peacock in a garden filled with flowers and ferns. The cover is similarly decorated and topped with a traditional round knop covered in blue. Made in the Netherlands circa 1780, jars like this would have been placed on a mantle or a bracket.

    Dimensions: Height 12.25″ x diameter at widest point 5.25″ x diameter at base 3.5″

    Condition: Excellent with small edge chips invisibly restored. The underside is partially glazed, which was the tradition in many 18th century Delft factories.

  • Antique Delft Blue and White Charger Made, circa 1760

    $1,820.00

    We are pleased to offer this exceptional 18th century Delft charger painted in a crisp, bold, geometric pattern. Made in England circa 1760, this energetic Blue and White design indicates that the charger was likely made in the Lambeth High Street factory in Vauxhall, London. For a similar example of a blue and white Delftware dish, see “London Delftware” by Frank Britton on page 69. With its marvelous bold geometry, this charger will work well in either a modern or traditional home.

    Dimensions: 13 inches in diameter.

    Condition: Excellent with small edge chips invisibly restored

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Hand-Painted in Netherlands 18th Century Circa 1780

    $1,100.00

    This blue and white Dutch Delft charger was hand-painted circa 1780. The center of the charger is decorated with a large flower. Beyond the center, we see flowers that seem to follow one another around in a circle actively. The vibrant decoration draws your eye from the center outward.

    Dimensions: diameter 13.75″

    Condition: Very Good (with small edge chips invisibly restored)

  • Pair Small Blue and White Delft Vases Made Netherlands, Circa 1790

    $1,620.00

    This pair of exquisite, blue and white Dutch Delft vases is painted in a deep shade of cobalt blue. They are 7″ tall, which is a rare small size for Delft vases. The decoration on the vases and the covers shows a wild profusion of flowers. Along the base, we see a simple design of scrolling vines. A traditional bird and ball finial tops the covers. The underside is marked VDuijn for Ysbrand van Duijn the owner of De Porceleyne Schotel from 1782-1800, at which time the factory is thought to have closed.

    Dimensions: 7″ tall x 3.25″ wide x 2″ deep

    Condition: Current condition is excellent with small edge chips invisibly restored

  • 18th Century Faience Puppy Made in Brussels circa 1760

    $4,400.00

    WHY WE LOVE IT: His attitude!
    We are pleased to offer this 18th century Brussels Faience figure of a puppy naturalistically modeled, painted with floppy ears, bulging eyes, and a topknot. He is seated on a green rectangular base. This charming puppy will make a wonderful addition to any dog lover’s home. Requiring little care except for an occasional dusting.

  • Odd Fellows Creamware Pitcher Very Large England Circa 1850

    $1,640.00

    This very large creamware pitcher is fully decorated with the imagery and symbols of the Odd Fellows (see images).
    Odd Fellows promote philanthropy, the ethic of reciprocity, and charity.
    At the front of the pitcher, we see a panel with the words “We are odd Fellows When we act and Do the  thing which is Right.”
    Around this panel are the words “How grand in Age How fair in Youth is Holly Friendship, Love and Truth.”
    Above the panel is an open palm with a heart symbolic of charity given from the heart.
    On both sides of the pitcher is the Odd Fellows motto, “Amicitia Amor et Veritas,”; which translates to Friendship, Love, and Truth.
    The motto is seen together with an image of Lady Justice and an angel holding a budding branch. Lady Justice personifies morality in judicial systems. The budding branch symbolizes the idea that truth can “draw freshness and verdure” from the “most barren facts and common things in life” and give them life and interest.
    Above all of this is a shining sun. As the sun shines on us all, it symbolizes impartiality in the benevolence of the Odd Fellows.

    Dimensions: 9.75″ tall x 8.25″ diameter
    Condition: An invisible restoration to the underside of the vase, only, and some scratching, particularly to the lustered leaves and the flowers and the lustered top edge.

  • Large Majolica Owl Pitcher Art Nouveau Style Made in England, Late 19th Century

    $870.00

    A marvelous Majolica owl made in the Art Nouveau style in England circa 1890. The figure is painted in bright enamels with stunning pink breast feathers, turquoise eyes, and deep brown feathers on the sides and back. The owl stands on a twisting green branch which forms the handle of the pitcher. A single pink and yellow flower forms the thumb rest at the top handle.

    Dimensions: 11″ tall x 4.75″ across x 6″ deep

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair Tortoiseshell Ware Called Whieldon Ware England Mid-18th Century Circa 1765

    $1,680.00

    This pair of antique creamware dishes each have exquisite tortoiseshell decoration. Though these dishes were made in mid-18th century England, circa 1765, they look strikingly modern. The decoration was made on a buff or cream-colored plate by sponging or dusting dry, powdered, metallic oxides onto the plate after its initial firing. The seemingly contemporary, abstract look was created using colored oxide stains, which ran freely when heated in the kiln. As a result, each piece of tortoiseshell creamware is unique.
    Creamware with this type of decoration is also known as Whieldon ware. It was developed by the English master potter Thomas Whieldon.

    Dimensions: diameter 9.25″ and 9.5.”

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Jar Hand-Painted in The Netherlands Mid 20th Century

    $1,630.00

    This blue and white jar is a hand-painted gem of mid 20th century Delft. What makes this jar so exceptional is the exquisite deep rich blue painting. Made by De Porceleyne Fles, this lovely jar is beautifully decorated with flowers, rockwork, and butterflies in a traditional Delft theme. The ribbed body sits on a traditional octagonal base. The ribbing adds life to the decoration as light plays over the curves.

    Dimensions: 12″ tall x 6.75″ at widest point x 5.25″ across the base

    Condition: Excellent

  • Set 11 Large Masons Ironstone Dinner Plates Circa 1915

    $4,300.00

    The color is fabulous.

    This excellent set of eleven Mason’s Ironstone plates is decorated in rich rust color with overall black detailing resembling sharkskin. This attractive set dates to circa 1915.  On the reverse is a transfer printed crown and banner in black with the pattern number ‘C.1753’ in iron-red, and the impressed “2XG” and “ENGLAND,” which Masons began to stamp after 1891. The marks indicate Masons made the set circa 1915.

    Dimensions: 10.5″ diameter.                      Price: $4,300

    Condition: Good with crazing to the reverse of the dishes (see images #10 and #11). Crazing results from the initial firing process in 1915 when the glaze and the earthenware body under it expanded and contracted at different rates during the heating and cooling process.

  • Four Blue and White Delft Dishes Made, Circa 1820

    $1,870.00

    A set of four antique blue and white Dutch Delft dishes showing flowers, a vase, and a pieced rock. The deep cobalt blue is splendid on the bright white tin glaze background. The border is filled with four panels each with a floral design. Between the panels is a zig-zag design.

    Dimensions: 9.35″ diameter

    Condition: Very good. Tiny edge frits invisibly restored.

  • Pair Blue and White Delft Dishes Hand-Painted, Circa 1780

    $865.00

    A pair of blue and white Dutch Delft dishes hand-painted in the chinoiserie style. The center of each dish shows two flowering plants in full bloom. Look closely, and you will see that all the painting is done in lines as if by pen or pencil. This suggests that an experienced painter outlined the images, which an apprentice or less experienced painter then filled in. The delicate lobed edges are the final touch that makes these dishes especially wonderful.

    Dimensions: 9″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent with small edge frits invisibly restored.

  • Chinese Porcelain Plate Hand-Painted with Mandarin Ducks, Circa 1860

    $1,230.00

    This beautiful mid 19th-century Chinese plate was hand-painted in the Famille Rose style in the  Qing dynasty, circa 1860. The plate depicts two Mandarin ducks swimming on a lotus pond. They look at each other and seem to smile. This is a happy plate with a symbolic message. Mandarin ducks are thought to mate for life. Therefore, in Chinese lore, they represent a happy marriage. In the Qianlong period, this would have been a perfect wedding gift! The plate is finely painted in exquisite polychrome enamels. We see pink shading into lavender pink and blue shading into light blue and turquoise. Highlights of grey, yellow, green, and light brown with gilt are framed by waveforms in bright white. On the border, we see the eight Chinese immortals, some riding wonderful mythical beasts. On the reverse of the plate are three traditional iron-red flower sprays.

    Dimensions: diameter 8.75.”

    Condition: Excellent

  • Set of Five Antique Porcelain Dishes Hand-Painted, England, Circa 1830

    $1,200.00

    This set of five Coalport Porcelain dinner dishes was made in England circa 1830. In the center of each one is a bouquet of exquisite hand-painted flowers. The close-up images show the exceptional flower painting. A wide green and white dotted border encircles the center. It has three glided panels, each with a single hand-painted flower.

    Dimensions: 10″ diameter

    Condition: One plate with fine knife marks to the enamels (see image #8) Price: $1200 for the set of five.

  • Two Pairs of Derby Porcelain Shaped Dishes Hand-Painted England, Circa 1810

    $1,300.00

    This group of four Derby Porcelain dishes was hand-painted in England circa 1810. An exquisite design of curling feathers and neoclassical objects decorates the borders. The color combinations are what makes these dishes so wonderful, red shading into orange and purple with touches of both dark and light blue, mix with exquisite golden gilding. The bright white porcelain makes the bold colors stand out even more. Lobed edges add interest to these sophisticated and beautifully shaped dishes. The reverse of the dishes with the Derby Porcelain mark in use from 1780 to 1823.

    Dimensions: The shell shapes:10″ x 9.5″, the oval shapes 12″ x 9.5″

    Condition: Excellent

  • A Large Mochaware Mug With Rare Combed Down Rows of Slip

    $3,300.00

    An exceptional mochaware mug with rare combed-down slip decoration. The renowned expert on Mocaware, Jonathan Rickard, lists this type of decoration in “Mocha and Related Dipped Wares 1770-1939” in a section entitled “Combinations and Other Oddities”, pages 106-121. According to Rickard “A further enhancement of the marbling process involved the use of a tool that functioned much like a comb by dragging the toothed tool through the wet marbling in a … constant direction”. The resulting decoration is exquisite. The handle of the mug has lovely foliate terminals. The top and bottom of the mug are each decorated with three bands of blue slip.                                                                                                                                                                                    The managers of mochaware factories often only specified the style of the work but gave each turner some freedom regarding the choice of design and colors. With rare exceptions, each piece of mochaware is unique.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Height: 6″

    Condition: Very slight wear to the bottom edge and handle, a very small flake on the handle see image #4 —a few very small firing and slip turning defects as originally made (see images).

  • Dutch Delft Hand-Painted Charger Painted Polychrome Colors 18th Century, c- 1760

    $1,220.00

    A Dutch Delft charger hand-painted in colorful polychrome. Made in the mid 18th century, the charger shows a traditional Dutch Delft design of an overflowing flower basket in panels. The panels are separated by an exquisite medium blue decorated with scrolling vines. Soft green, manganese, orange, and iron red work together to create a beautiful design.

    Dimensions: diameter 12″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Delft Charger Hand-Painted, Netherlands, 18th Century, Circa 1760

    $945.00

    The entire surface of this beautiful blue and white Dutch Delft charger is covered in deep cobalt blue coloring. The center of the charger is filled with hand-painted peonies; while the wide border is painted with a net-like pattern of peonies, leaves, and scrolling vines. This charger was made in the Netherlands in the mid-18th century, circa 1760.

    Dimensions: 12″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Pair of Imari Saucers in the “King’s” Pattern Made in England, Circa 1820

    $480.00

    Derby made this pair of “King’s” pattern imari saucers circa 1820. They are hand-painted in the Imari colors of cobalt blue, iron-red, and gold overlay with green, light blue, and true red accents on a white porcelain ground. The border shows a series of panels with geometric designs alternating with flowers on a cobalt blue ground.

    Dimensions: 5.75″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Dutch Delft Charger Made, Circa 1780

    $1,200.00

    Why we love it: The intense cobalt blue We are pleased to offer this sizeable Dutch Delft blue and white charger hand-painted in deep cobalt blue. This exquisite charger was made in the 18th century, circa 1780. It shows a vase filled with sunflowers and ferns. The design is reminiscent of a peacock displaying its feathers. That is why this pattern has been known since the 18th century as the “Peacock” pattern. The blue on the rim of the charger is painted in.

    Dimensions: diameter 13.85 inches

    Condition: Very good

  • Mochaware Mug with Seaweed Decoration

    $1,930.00

    Made in England circa 1810, this exquisite mug is decorated with two orange-colored slip bands. Each band is decorated with midnight brown “seaweed” over the slip. The orange bands are separated by bands four thin bands of midnight brown and a beautiful band of green glazed rouletting along the mug’s top and base. The managers of mochaware factories often only specified the style of the work but gave each turner some freedom regarding the choice of design and colors. With rare exceptions, each piece of mochaware is unique.

    Dimensions: 4.75″ tall x 3.25″ diameter

    Condition: Excellent

  • Antique Faience Cabbage Form Soup Tureen Hand-Painted in Brussels Circa 1765

    $18,700.00

    This faience soup tureen was made in the Philippe Mombaers factory in Brussels circa 1765; the cabbage tureen, its cover, and stand are painted in green tones with yellow highlights. The color combination is exquisite. The tureen is a gem of naturalism. Beautifully molded, the cabbage sits on a stand formed by cabbage leaves. The finial is in the form of a snail. Practiced gardeners know that snails are often found in the cabbage patch late in the growing season. A snail munching on this faience cabbage would have delighted the dinner guests when the soup tureen was presented at the table. Tureens in vegetable and animal forms were the height of a fashionable table setting in the Louis XV period.

    Dimensions: 14″ diameter of base x 9″ tall        Condition: Very Good. The snail’s antennae are restored. There are some very tiny losses to the glaze. There is a very fine, thin, professionally sealed hairline on the edge of the cover (See image #7). It can only be seen from the inside.

  • Large Blue & White Delft Charger Hand-Painted w/ Cobalt Blue 18th Century c-1760

    $1,630.00

    A huge blue and white Delft charger hand-painted in cobalt blue with peonies encircling a central flower.
    Made in the Netherlands circa 1760, the charger is decorated all over with flowers arranged in a floral pattern (see image #2)
    The reverse of the charger is decorated with nine panels in the style of early to mid 18th century Delft.

    Dimensions: diameter 15.5″

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White and Gold Dish Made in England by Spode, Circa 1820

    $420.00

    This exquisite Regency period dish is painted in underglaze deep blue cobalt. Because the porcelain is translucent the intensity of the blue varies in the light. The blue ground is decorated with golden leaves and white peonies and daisies. The design is so well done that we can almost feel the texture of white flowers. The vibrant cobalt blue and the lavish gilt are as stunning today as they were 200 years ago.

    Dimensions: diameter 8.25″ x 1.5″ height

    Condition: Excellent

  • Blue and White Dutch Delft Dish Made, Circa 1760

    $950.00

    Why we love it: The cobalt blue is exquisite!
    Provenance: An identical dish is in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. For an image of this identical plate and a discussion of its origins, see: E B Schaap “Delft Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art” pages 74 and 75.
    We are pleased to offer this Dutch Delft dish in the “Theeboom” pattern showing a tea plant with a fan-shaped bouquet of leaves and flowers. It was quite popular in the mid-18th century. The decoration fills the well of the charger. On the border are medallions and floral designs. The edges are delicately scalloped, which adds another beautiful dimension to the dish.

    Dimensions: 10 inches diameter

    Condition: Excellent

    We also have a selection of 13″-14″ diameter chargers in this pattern in the shop.

Showing 1–100 of 246 results